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I'm trying to write a Perl program that takes a file from the command line, counts the number of lines (which is working), shows the size of the file in bytes (which only works when I put the print statement in the while loop, but that prints the size of the line I think, because it's different each loop), the total number of words, and counts the number of occurrences of a particular search word also from the command line.

How can I make it work as expected?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $linecount = 0;
my $wordcount = 0;
my $filesize = 0;
my $search = <>;

while (defined(my $file = <>)) {
    chomp($file);

    my $filesize = length $file;

    if (m/$search/){
        my $wordcount++;
    }

    $linecount = 1;
    $linecount++;
}

print "Size of file in bytes: $filesize\n";
print "Number of line(s): $linecount\n";
print "Number of occurences of $search: $wordcount\n";
share|improve this question
    
$search is first line from the file, is that what you want? how do you call script from command line? –  Сухой27 Nov 8 '13 at 8:11
    
Yes it's meant to be taking the file line by line, which I tested and it does. I'm using ./perl1.pl testfile.txt hello. Hello being my search word –  user2963286 Nov 8 '13 at 8:15
    
length $file returns the number of characters in the string, not the size of the file. –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 8:15
    
Oh. I tired using $filesize = -s $file but it didn't work. –  user2963286 Nov 8 '13 at 8:18
    
if(m/$search/) has a bunch of issues. First and most importantly, it matches against $_, not $file. So you should get lots of warnings about that (since you wisely have warnings turned on). Secondly, it only matches one time per line in the file, which of course means you get a lower count that you actually have. Third, this will take into account meta characters in the search string, and will match case sensitively. –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

Quick code review:

use strict;
use warnings;

A very good choice. These pragmas provide information about your code, and help you avoid mistakes.

my $search = <>;

Here you take the first line of the input as the search string. This is probably not what you want. If you are searching through a file, I am guessing the file does not contain the search word in the first line. What you probably are trying to do is access the command line arguments, which are found in @ARGV.

my $search = shift;  

This is the idiomatic way to access @ARGV. It is short for shift @ARGV, which takes the first argument off @ARGV.

while (defined(my $file = <>)) {
    chomp($file);
    my $filesize = length $file;

I get the impression that you think that $file is actually the file name. You said you tried -s $file, which would have worked, if $file had contained the file name. However, the while loop reads from the input file handle <> and assigns the lines of the file to $file. If you want to access the file name, you probably want $ARGV. And you only want to do this once, after the while loop:

my $filesize = -s $ARGV;

Keep in mind that if you use more than one file, $ARGV will change as it refers to the name of the file currently being read with <>. (Technically <ARGV>)

The while loop itself should probably use a different variable name:

while (my $line = <>)

Note that you do not technically need to use defined here.

Also, length returns the number of characters in a string. If you use it on a file name, it returns the number of characters in the file name. It has nothing to do with file size.

if (m/$search/){
    my $wordcount++;
}

This pattern match applies to the default variable $_. What you want is $file =~ m/..../. Also, do you want meta characters to be active in the regex? You might want, for example, to allow plural s with /apples?/. Meta characters can change the meaning of your pattern match, however, so if you just want to match literal strings, use the \Q ... \E escape to disable meta characters.

Another thing, you use my here to declare a new variable (which shadows the previously declared variable). This variable only has the scope of the surrounding if block, so it is quite pointless. Remove my.

Yet another thing is that this match only matches once per line, so you miss out on multiple matches. What you want is probably this:

$wordcount += () = $line =~ /\Q$search\E/g;

Note the use of the global /g modifier which makes the regex match as many times as possible (and not just once). Using () in scalar context returns the number of matches from the pattern match.

$linecount = 1;
$linecount++;

This sets the count to 2. No matter how many lines are in your file, this will never be more than 2. You want to remove the assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
somehow =()= idiom doesn't look too pretty, and $wordcount += @{[ $line =~ /\Q$search\E/g ]}; doesn't help either. –  Сухой27 Nov 8 '13 at 8:59
    
@mpapec It does the job, pretty or not. The most readable way is to do what you did earlier, and use a temporary array to count the matches. –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 9:06
    
Yes I was thinking that $file had the file name, not the line, thanks for correcting me. Why does my $filesize = -s $ARGV; need to be after the while loop? Also, for some reason my $filesize = -s $file; does work :/ –  user2963286 Nov 8 '13 at 9:08
    
You're welcome. $ARGV is not assigned until <> is used. But if you are just searching one file, it is better to do as mpapec suggested and get the file name at the start. -s $file will work if $file is the name of a file. –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 9:24

I'm using ./perl1.pl testfile.txt hello. Hello being my search word

Reading from <> tells perl to read lines from all files stated on command line (or alternatively lines from STDIN).

Since parameters from cmd line are stored in @ARGV, and hello is not a file in your example, it should be removed and stored elsewhere (my $search = pop @ARGV;)

use strict;
use warnings;

my $linecount = 0;
my $wordcount = 0;
my $search = pop @ARGV;
my ($file) = @ARGV;
my $filesize = -s $file;

while (my $line = <>) {
    chomp($line);

    $wordcount++ while $line =~ /$search/g;

    $linecount++;
}

print "Size of file in bytes: $filesize\n";
print "Number of line(s): $linecount\n";
print "Number of occurrences of $search: $wordcount\n";
share|improve this answer
    
You probably meant while ($line =~ /.../g). –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 8:48
    
@TLP again tnx for comment –  Сухой27 Nov 8 '13 at 8:50

Do you know how pattern matching works in Perl? Here's what I'd do:

foreach $match ($line =~ /\w+/gi)
{
  chomp($match);

  if($match eq $search)
  {
     $wordcount++;
  }
}

I replaced "$file" with "$line", because it was a little confusing. I guess the chomp isn't really necessary in your case since you've already done it before. The pattern [\w]+ will search for a sequence of 1 or more "word" characters from the line, and store the resulting match in $match. The =~ operator works such that it will continuously move through the $line variable, storing the words it finds into $match. The "g" flag on the match is for global, which means it will search the whole line. The following "i" is for case insensitive searching (you can get rid of this if you want). Then, if the match is the same as our search variable, we increment our wordcount.

share|improve this answer
2  
[\w] better written \w. –  TLP Nov 8 '13 at 8:21
    
Errr yes, thanks. This is code I took from one of my own projects, and I originally had more than just \w in there. Thanks. –  limitlessinfinity Nov 8 '13 at 8:24
    
Okay I think I understand how that works. So a space wouldn't be a word character then? Else it would just take the whole line yes? Sorry, just want to make sure I have it. Also thank you, that part is now working :) –  user2963286 Nov 8 '13 at 8:46
    
Right, because the pattern matching hit something it didn't recognize (a space, tab, etc), it stops right there and returns what it read so far as $match. –  limitlessinfinity Nov 8 '13 at 8:50

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