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I am trying to read a text file line by line using fget() in c++ and the "plus-minus" symbols show up as a "?" symbol. Does it have anything to do with the encoding. I tried switching to Unicode but the result is worse. Please help

Thanks. EDIT: This is my code:

#define AMINOACIDS "ARNDCQEGHILKMFPSTWYV"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int getAmino(char* index, int j_index, int i_index){

    int j = 0;  
    char *buffer = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);
    FILE *file; 
    file = fopen("blosum50.txt", "r");

    if(file == NULL){   
        perror("Error at opening the file!");
    }else{

        while (!feof(file))
        {
            printf("In while:\n");
            if (fgets(buffer , 100 , file) == NULL ){       
                break;
            }

            fputs (buffer , stdout);

            if(j == j_index){
                break;
            }
            j++;
        }
        fclose (file);
     }
   return 0;
   }
int main(void){
   char *aMatrix = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * (21));
    strcpy(aMatrix, AMINOACIDS);
    getAmino(aMatrix, 0, 1);
    return 0;
}

Then, when I hit Ctrl+S it pops up a message: enter image description here

If I press No, the symbols show up as a "?" symbol: enter image description here

If I press Yes, they show up like this: enter image description here

And this is the content of my file:

5 −2 −1 −2 −1 −1 −1 0 −2 −1 −2 −1 −1 −3 -1 1 −0 −3 −2 0 −2 7 −1 −2 −4 1 0 −3 0 -4 −3 3 −2 −3 −3 −1 −1 −3 −1 −3 −1 −1 7 2 −2 0 0 0 1 −3 −4 0 −2 −4 −2 1 0 −4 −2 −3 −2 −2 2 8 −4 0 2 −1 −1 −4 −4 −1 −4 −5 −1 0 −1 −5 −3 −4 −1 −4 −2 −4 13 −3 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −3 −2 −2 −4 −1 −1 −5 −3 −1 −1 1 0 0 −3 7 2 −2 1 −3 −2 2 0 -4 −1 0 −1 −1 −1 −3 −1 0 0 2 −3 2 6 −3 0 −4 −3 1 −2 −3 −1 −1 −1 −3 −2 −3 0 −3 0 −1 −3 −2 −3 8 −2 −4 −4 −2 −3 −4 −2 0 −2 −3 −3 −4 −2 0 1 −1 −3 1 0 −2 10 −4 −3 0 −1 −1 −2 −1 −2 −3 2 −4 −1 −4 −3 −4 −2 −3 −4 −4 −4 5 2 −3 2 0 −3 −3 −1 −3 −1 4 −2 −3 −4 −4 −2 −2 −3 −4 −3 2 5 −3 3 1 −4 −3 −1 −2 −1 1 −1 3 0 −1 −3 2 1 −2 0 −3 −3 6 −2 −4 −1 0 −1 −3 −2 −3 −1 −2 −2 −4 −2 0 −2 −3 −1 2 3 −2 7 0 −3 −2 −1 −1 0 1 −3 −3 −4 −5 −2 −4 −3 −4 −1 0 1 −4 0 8 −4 −3 −2 1 4 −1 −1 −3 −2 −1 −4 −1 −1 −2 −2 −3 −4 −1 −3 −4 10 −1 −1 −4 −3 −3 1 −1 1 0 −1 0 −1 0 −1 −3 −3 0 −2 −3 −1 5 2 −4 −2 −2 0 −1 0 −1 −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −1 −1 −1 −1 −2 −1 2 5 −3 −2 0 −3 −3 −4 −5 −5 −1 −3 −3 −3 −3 −2 −3 −1 1 −4 −4 −3 15 2 −3 −2 −1 −2 −3 −3 −1 −2 −3 2 −1 −1 −2 0 4 −3 −2 −2 2 8 −1 0 −3 −3 −4 −1 −3 −3 −4 −4 4 1 −3 1 −1 −3 −2 0 −3 −1 5

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7  
Show us the code, show us the file. –  Paul Tomblin Nov 8 '13 at 8:09
1  
What exactly do you mean with "worse". –  Philipp Nov 8 '13 at 8:10
1  
What encoding does the file have? And where do you see the ?? If you try to output it on the console: you probably can't :) –  Theolodis Nov 8 '13 at 8:11
    
What do you mean by "show up as"? –  David Schwartz Nov 8 '13 at 8:11
    
Yes it's definitely something to do with encoding, but without seeing either the file or the code no-one will be able to tell you what the problem is. Need to see the code and the bytes in the file. Also remember that the problem may not be that you cannot read a plus-minus, it may be that you cannot write one properly. –  john Nov 8 '13 at 8:14

2 Answers 2

"Save as Unicode" in Visual Studio saves the file as UTF-8 with a "Byte Order Mark"(U+FEFF) prefix. That's why you see 3 characters before the 5 in your second example.

I'm guessing from the jumble of characters that your "plus minus" is actually ∓ not ± ? Because they appear to be read correctly, just not interpreted correctly. You're passing fputs the raw string, and it expects ASCII. Not UTF-8.

MultiByteToWideChar can convert to UTF-16, which you can then pass to WriteConsoleW. Microsoft C++ makes a proper mess of Unicode output, which is strange because Microsoft Windows natively can do it.

share|improve this answer
    
U+FEFF is BOM for UTF-16, not for UTF-8. –  dbasic Nov 8 '13 at 9:46
    
It looks like you want to say UTF-16 in place of UTF-8. –  dbasic Nov 8 '13 at 9:46
    
I'm using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Professional and I have only the Unicode(UTF-8 without signature). Nothing's changed. –  Carmen Cojocaru Nov 8 '13 at 10:04
    
@dbasic: the U+ notation denotes codepoints, independent of their encoding. E.g. "A" = U+0041, and can be saved as 00 41 (UTF16-LE), 41 00 (UTF-16 BE), 41 (UTF-8) or even 00 00 00 41 (UTF32-LE) –  MSalters Nov 8 '13 at 11:09

plus-minus symbol is not the part of standard ASCII (that is from 0-127, 128-255 is extended ASCII).

Extended ASCII value of plus-minus is 241 in decimal.

Unicode code-point is U+00B1 (that is hexadecimal).

When you are saving file as Unicode, it looks like it is UTF-16 encoding. And in your code what you are trying to read in ASCII mode. That is why output looks like this.

On Windows, it should show character 241 (decimal) as ±. So, if it is 241 in ASCII, it should look like ±.

So, check the character ASCII value or unicode value of the file using some hex editor. This can give you better picture.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not only about he way they are displayed. This affects the parsing also. I get all kinds of characters and I cannot convert them to int. –  Carmen Cojocaru Nov 8 '13 at 8:53
    
What is the value of that character? –  dbasic Nov 8 '13 at 9:05
    
There's about a million extensions to ASCII, so it really doesn't make sense to talk about the extended ASCII. E.g. in UTF-8, 0-127 is still ASCII, but 241 definitely is NOT ±. You are right that ± is U+00B1, though. –  MSalters Nov 8 '13 at 9:20
    
@dbasic The characters are those from the second console picture. –  Carmen Cojocaru Nov 8 '13 at 10:06

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