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I'm attempting to make a table that has header rows that can be collapsed and expanded by using jQuery. Here is the entirety of my code thus far:

<html>                                                                  
<head>                                                                  
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<link href="styles.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />


<script type="text/javascript">                                         
$(document).ready(function() {

   $("tr#cat1.header").click(function () { 
      $("tr#cat1.child").each(function() {
         $(this).slideToggle("fast");
      });
   });


});

</script>                                                               

</head>                                                                 
<body>                                                                  

<table>
    <tr id="cat1" class="header">
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat1" class="child">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat1" class="child">
        <td>data3</td>
        <td>data4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat2" class="header">
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat2" class="child">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
</table>

</body>                                                                 
</html>

If I am correct, the jQuery part in English reads like: "When a row that has an ID of 'cat1' and a class of 'header' is clicked, find all rows that have an id of 'cat1' and a class of 'child', and for each one, slideToggle."

Yet when I run it and click on a header row, nothing happens. Any insight?

EDIT: Added a second category to the HTML table. Sorry, I should have been more specific. I want to be able to click on a header row for a particular category, and have only those child rows collapse, not all child rows on the page. In such a manner the table behaves like an "accordian", and the rows are grouped together by category.

share|improve this question
1  
you'll need to change the ids assigned to the <tr> elements as ids need to be unique to be in accordance with the HTML spec –  Russ Cam Dec 31 '09 at 14:42
    
Thanks Russ, I didn't realize. I'm attempting to group rows together by category. Is there any way to do this aside from creating two CSS classes for every category (one for the header row and one for the children rows)? –  David Hague Dec 31 '09 at 14:57
    
You wouldn't necessarily need 2 CSS classes for each category - it would work fine using only one CSS class for the header and child rows. –  Russ Cam Dec 31 '09 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This will cause the click to only affect the rows in the table containing the header you clicked on, which means you can change it to work with a css class instead of duplicating the id.

$("tr#cat1.header").click(function () { 
   $("tr#cat1.child", $(this).parent()).slideToggle("fast");
});

Basically this is the header that is clicked, we wrap that in a jQuery object and call parent() (which returns the table), and then specify it as the context for the new query.

Your page now looks something like this:

<html>                                                                  
<head>                                                                  
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.js"></script>
<link href="styles.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />


<script type="text/javascript">                                         
$(document).ready(function() {

   $("tr.header").click(function () { 
      $("tr.child", $(this).parent()).slideToggle("fast");
   });


});

</script>                                                               

</head>                                                                 
<body>                                                                  

<table>
    <tr class="header">
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="child">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="child">
        <td>data3</td>
        <td>data4</td>
    </tr>
</table>

<table>
    <tr class="header">
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="child">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="child">
        <td>data3</td>
        <td>data4</td>
    </tr>
</table>
</body>                                                                 
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
P.S. I'm having a little trouble getting slideToggle to work in IE, but it work's fine in Opera. –  Rory Dec 31 '09 at 15:12
    
It's working in IE again but theres no animation, it looks like it just pops in and out of existence. Leave it to IE to be a pain... –  Rory Dec 31 '09 at 15:23
    
This is exactly what I'm looking for. It took me a while to figure out the line: $("tr.child", $(this).parent()).slideToggle("fast"); but I think I've got it now: "for each row where the class is 'child' and the parent of that row is the row that was clicked, slideToggle. Brilliant, thank you! –  David Hague Dec 31 '09 at 15:24
    
Woops, so close. Should read: "for each row where the class is 'child' and the parent of that row is the table where the header row was clicked, slideToggle that child row in that table" –  David Hague Dec 31 '09 at 15:32
    
+1 - I came back to suggest using multiple tables (but it looks like you've already done that!) because semantically you shouldn't have headers interspersed throughout a single table. I'll be updating my answer as well to accommodate multiple tables. –  John Rasch Dec 31 '09 at 15:34

This is an expansion of @Rory's answer to handle multiple levels of hierarchy, also I prefer fadeToggle to slideToggle as (at least in FF v24) when you have hundreds of rows in your table then the slideToggle does nothing for a second and then all the rows suddenly disappear - which makes you wonder if you've actually clicked the row. fadeToggle instantly begins to fade the rows so you know something's happening.

Instead of the child class I use the id of the direct parent, then you can recursively work through each branch. Also there is a 'collapsed' class that I use to fix the bug of collapsing a parent row when there is a child row that is already collapsed.

Please see the JSFiddle of the below code:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.1.js"></script>
<link href="http://getbootstrap.com/2.3.2/assets/css/bootstrap.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<script type="text/javascript">                                         
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('tr.header').click(function () { 
        toggleRowChildren($(this), 'header');
    });

    function toggleRowChildren(parentRowElement, parentClass) {
        var childClass = parentRowElement.attr('id');
        $('tr.'+childClass, parentRowElement.parent()).fadeToggle('fast');
        $('tr.'+childClass).each(function(){
            if ($(this).hasClass(parentClass) && !$(this).hasClass('collapsed')) {
                toggleRowChildren($(this), parentClass);
            }
        });
        parentRowElement.toggleClass('collapsed');
    }
});
</script>                                                               
</head>                                                                 
<body>                                                                  
<table class="table table-hover table-bordered">
    <tr id="cat1" class="header">
        <th>Cat1</th>
        <th>Row</th>
    </tr>
    <tr class="cat1">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat1a" class="header cat1">
        <th>Cat1a</th>
        <th>Row</th>
    </tr>
    <tr class="cat1a">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="cat1a">
        <td>data3</td>
        <td>data4</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="cat2" class="header">
        <th>Cat2</th>
        <th>Row</th>
    </tr>
    <tr class="cat2">
        <td>data1</td>
        <td>data2</td>
    </tr>
</table>
</body>                                                                 
</html>
share|improve this answer

Firstly, you shouldn't have duplicate IDs for the rows. IDs should be unique for each element on the page.

Also, you shouldn't have to use each, as jQuery will automatically apply the slideToggle function to each element matched by the selector. I would suggest dropping the IDs and using the class names instead:

$("tr.header").click(function () { 
   $("tr.child").slideToggle("fast");
});

If you want to make sure only certain tables can perform this toggle functionality, put a class on the table and update your selectors:

<table class="collapsible">
    <tr>
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Collapsible</td>
        <td>Row</td>
---

$(".collapsible tr:first").click(function () { 
   $(this).nextAll().slideToggle("fast");
});

Response to edit:

Rory's answer is correct, I am simply expanding upon it. If you use multiple tables, you can remove the CSS classes from the <tr>s on the rows and simplify the tables down to:

<table class="collapsible">
    <tr>
        <td>Cat1</td>
        <td>Cat1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Collapsible</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
</table>

<table class="collapsible">
    <tr>
        <td>Cat2</td>
        <td>Cat2</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Collapsible</td>
        <td>Row</td>
    </tr>
</table>

and the jQuery down to:

$(".collapsible tr:first").click(function () {  
   $(this).nextAll().slideToggle("fast"); 
});
share|improve this answer
    
The problem I will run into here is that all child rows will collapse when I click on any header, whereas I'd rather only the child rows for THAT header collapse. This is what I was attempting to accomplish by having the same IDs for a group of rows (kind of as a way to group them together). I've edited the question to reflect this. Any suggestions since multiple tags with the same ID is clearly wrong? –  David Hague Dec 31 '09 at 14:50
    
@David: Take a look at my answer, it takes care of what you want without using duplicate id values. –  Rory Dec 31 '09 at 15:10
    
+1 I completely forgot about :first, shows what happens when you go on leave for a month ^_^ –  Rory Dec 31 '09 at 15:47

Shouldn't it be more like this? I mean, this is normally the whole document.

   $("tr#cat1.header").click(function () { 
      $("tr#cat1.child").slideToggle("fast");
   });
share|improve this answer

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