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I have a simply camel MINA server using the JAVA DSL, and I am running like the example documented here:

Currently this server receives reports from a queue, updates them, and then sends them away to the next server. A very simple code:

public class MyApp_B {

    private Main main;

    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
        MyApp_B loadbalancer = new MyApp_B();
        loadbalancer.boot();
    }

    public void boot() throws Exception {
        main = new Main();
        main.enableHangupSupport();

        main.addRouteBuilder(
                new RouteBuilder(){
                    @Override
                    public void configure() throws Exception {
                        from("mina:tcp://localhost:9991")
                        .setHeader("minaServer", constant("localhost:9991"))
                        .beanRef("service.Reporting", "updateReport")
                        .to("direct:messageSender1");

                        from("direct:messageSender1")
                        .to("mina:tcp://localhost:9993")
                        .log("${body}");
                    }
                }
        );

        System.out.println("Starting Camel MyApp_B. Use ctrl + c to terminate the JVM.\n");
        main.run();
    }
}

Now, I would like to know if it is possible to do two things:

  1. Make this server send a message to a master server when it starts running. This is an "Hello" message with this server's information basically.
  2. Tell the master server to forget him when I shut it down pressing CTRL+C or doing something else.

I have also read this:

technically, by overriding the doStart and doStop methods I should get the intended behavior, however, those methods (specially the doStop method) don't work at all.

Is there a way to do this ? If yes how? If not, what are my options?

Thanks in advance, Pedro.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code does work properly after all. The problem is my IDE, Eclipse. When using the Terminate button, Eclipse simply kills the process instead of send the CTRL+C signal to it. Furthermore it looks like Eclipse has no way of being able to send a CTRL+C signal to a process running on its console.

I have also created a discussion on Eclipse's official forums:

And may it some day help some one in a situation similar to mine.

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Good to know about this problem. Something like this can drive you mad. –  Namphibian Nov 14 '13 at 5:49

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