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I have two identical spans but for some reason the second one is displayed narrower. JSFiddle is down right now so here is a complete html example:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>asdf</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <span style="background-color:#ccc; margin-right:0.125em;">
            &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
        </span>
        <span style="background-color:#ccc; margin-right:0.125em;">
            &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
        </span>
    </body>
</html>

It seems the last one is always narrower but if I add more spans it gets even weirder. The first one will sometimes have a different width, with a value in between the wide middle ones and the narrow last one.

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
give your fiddle – Sridhar R Nov 8 '13 at 12:02
1  
@SridharR: JSFiddle is down right now and I can confirm that. – Johannes H. Nov 8 '13 at 12:04
    
Hmmm yes @JohannesH. – Sridhar R Nov 8 '13 at 12:05
    
use codepen – shennan Nov 8 '13 at 12:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

On the first on an extra space is inserted. If all spans are one-liners it works as expected:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>asdf</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <span style="background-color:#ccc; margin-right:0.125em;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>
        <span style="background-color:#ccc; margin-right:0.125em;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>
        <span style="background-color:#ccc; margin-right:0.125em;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>
    </body>
</html>

What are you trying to archive? If you want all spans to have the same length you should do that in CSS by setting

span {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 2rem;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked well. It's a poor man's bar chart that's generated dynamically by the application. I didn't know about inline-block. – acfrancis Nov 8 '13 at 12:15
    
For future reference, I've just figured out the last piece of the puzzle: since the width is defined in ems, the computed value comes out as 10.5px so Chrome alternates between 10px and 11px (to minimize rounding errors?). Setting a width in px fixes that. – acfrancis Nov 8 '13 at 12:29
    
Yeah, I tend to prefer specifying a font and define everything in rem as they give a bigger grid which (I think) makes it easier to align stuff. However that's just a personal preference, px is equally fine. – Pajn Nov 8 '13 at 12:57
    
I'm so behind the times, I thought rem was a typo. Good to know though. Everything else on this site is in ems so I'm sticking to that but it's good to know why the widths vary. – acfrancis Nov 8 '13 at 14:31

I think the reason, that margin does not extends the width of parent element http://jsbin.com/eHaNIR/1

share|improve this answer

Problem is space between tags.

Doesnt work:

<body>
  <span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span>
  <span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span>
</body>

Works well:

<body>
  <span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span>
  <span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span>
  works well because of this text
</body>

How to hack it:

span:after {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block
}

How to fix it correctlly (minify code):

<body><span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span><span margin-right:0.125em;"> &bnsp; </span></body>

Demo of fix with additional text:
http://jsbin.com/AFuPomI/1/edit

this can also help:
http://css-tricks.com/fighting-the-space-between-inline-block-elements/

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