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Using C++ What could possibly the best way for a sequence to run only once? To make it clearer for example that I have a program in where you need to guess a string, if the user entered hint I would display the hint of the word but I would only allow it once... I am currently doing this:

   bool hintLock = false;
   ...
if (guess == "hint"){
    if (!hintLock){
        cout << hint << endl;
        hintLock = true;
        }
    else
        cout << "I've given you the hint" << endl;
    }

Here's my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void main(){
    string  guess;
    bool    hintLock = false;
    cout << "Guess one of StackExchange's best site:  Type \"hint\" for hint" << endl << endl;
    do{
        cout << "Guess > ";
        cin >> guess;

        if (guess == "hint"){ // Here it is
            if (!hintLock){
            cout << hint << endl;
                hintLock = true;
                }
            else
                cout << "I've given you the hint" << endl;
            }
        }
    while (guess != "stackoverflow");
    cout << "You've got it right!" << endl;
    }

Is there any much better statement to do this? or is it already the best?

share|improve this question
    
userInput == "hint" you really didn't want to do that. –  jthill Nov 8 '13 at 15:56
1  
Well, first, allow seems like it should be a boolean (initialized to true and set to false when no longer allowed); secondly, allow != 1 ? true : userInput == "hint" is more generally expressed as allow and userInput == "hint" (or not allow and userInput == "hint"). –  Matthieu M. Nov 8 '13 at 15:57
    
@MatthieuM. Thanks for the info –  Yawz Nov 9 '13 at 7:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to make sure it only shows once for any particular run of the program (anything more global than that is pretty complicated and platfrom-specific), all you need is a global boolean to protect the function. For example:

bool shownHint = false;
void showHint() {
    if (!shownHint) {
        cout << "The hint is: ........" << endl;
        shownHint = true;
    } else {
        cout << "Hint has already been shown, no cheating!" << endl;
}

Whenever you think you might want to show the hint, call showHint() and it will show (or not) as appropriate.

The trick is making sure the variable is global (or a static, in a class, which looks almost the same), so that it doesn't get reset during your loop or otherwise while the program is running.

If you need to persist between runs, you could write to a file, check a server, set a registry key, or any number of other options.

share|improve this answer

I suspect that either you are overanalyzing things or you haven't adequately described the real problem. From the code you've posted, I see no reason why you shouldn't wrap the code you want to execute in to a function and then simply call that function one time.

void blahBlah()
{
  // blah blah
}

int main()
{
  if (userInput == "hint")
    blahBlah();
}

Perhaps what you meant is that in your program you have a main loop which executes until program termination, and in that loop you accept input from the user. The user is allowed to ask for a hint, but only once during the program's run. The first time the ask for a hint they are given one, but subsequent times they are not.

I still believe simple is better than fancy (read: complex). To that end, I start with having a bool scoped outside of the main loop which you check each time they ask for help:

int main()
{
  bool displayedHint = false;

  // program's main loop
  for (bool endProgram = false; !endProgram; )
  {
    std::string command = getUserInput();
    if (command == "hint")
    {
      if (displayedHint)
      {
        cout << "I already gave you a hint!\n";
      }
      else
      {
        displayHint();
        displayedHint = true;
      } 
    } 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I agree, but I think you mean to add some logic (a bool or something) saying that the "hint" was already used... since presumably this is all in a loop. –  Dave Nov 8 '13 at 14:41
1  
Maybe the OP checks the userInput several times and wants to give only one hint. But I agree with your first sentence. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 8 '13 at 14:41
    
@Dave: That's possible, but I really have no way of knowing. If the OP could clarify the real problem they are trying to solve, I could give more topical advice. This smells like an XY Problem to me. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 14:43
    
@Dave: Nonetheless, edited with deeper advice. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 14:49

I think that the most appropriate iteration statement is do-while. It allows at least one iteration

for example

do
{
   std::cout << "Enter your word: ";

   std::string answer;
   std::cin >> answer;

   // some other stuff
} while ( false );

Or

bool allow = true;
do
{
   std::cout << "Enter your word: ";

   std::string answer;
   std::cin >> answer;

   // some other stuff
} while ( allow = !allow );
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not about to iterate it, and as far as i know, they are made for loops. –  Yawz Nov 9 '13 at 7:21

You can use flags that are boolean, that represent a state in your system. Once the state is "defined", you can then query the state and find if it is "set" or "cleared"..

to be more precise

bool hasHinted = false; // unset or cleared( also definition of a state variable)
if(hasHinted == false){
   //do something
   hasHinted = true; // set
}else{
   // do nothing
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your wording implies that the state can not be querried before it is set. Strange. :) –  knivil Nov 8 '13 at 14:52
    
oops, sorry - I meant state is DEFINED there.. –  Aniket Nov 8 '13 at 14:54
    
@knivil I edited it. Thanks, I was probably thinking faster than typing there. –  Aniket Nov 8 '13 at 14:55

I think the OP is looking for a piece of code similar to singleton init. i.e.: only create the singleton once, and after that always return the pointer.

void Init() {
  static bool isInitialized = false;
  if (!isInitialized) {
    isInitialized = true;
    doRealInit();
  }
}

the same thing done with std::call_once as a comment suggests:

std::once_flag flag;
void do_once() {
  std::call_once(flag, [](){ std::cout << "Called once" << std::endl; });
}

in my opinion it's not really more readable or shorter.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think he is not looking for singleton. And: There are better ways in c++ to do what you your code suggest. E.g. let doRealInit return a bool and pass it to isInitialized as "constructor" .. or boost/std::once ... –  knivil Nov 8 '13 at 14:48
    
@knivil what's a singleton? –  Yawz Nov 9 '13 at 7:18

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