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function processAjaxResponse(data) {
    if (data == null) {
       // handle error...
    }
    else {
       // process data
    }
}

or

function processAjaxResponse(data) {
    if (!data) {
       // handle error...
    }
    else {
       // process data
    } 
}

I'm inclined to prefer the latter, because the top example doesn't handle the case where data is undefined. I think the latter is better practice. But the reason I ask is because I'm working with code that uses the former.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Ibrahim R. Najjar, putvande, tymeJV, Matthew Blancarte, legoscia Nov 8 '13 at 16:25

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
All a matter of opinion. Both are fine. –  tymeJV Nov 8 '13 at 15:42
    
Unless you are checking for a specific type with the triple equals (or even double equals in this case with null), like data === null, I would just go for the falsy bang in the second example. Like @tymeJV said, it's also a matter of preference. –  Matthew Blancarte Nov 8 '13 at 15:44
2  
It depends what possible values for data there are. data == null obviously only checks for null. !data will check if data is "falsy", meaning '', 0, false, null, and undefined will all match. –  Rocket Hazmat Nov 8 '13 at 15:44
    
In second case ur data has to be boolean –  Shoaib Chikate Nov 8 '13 at 15:44
1  
@ShoaibChikate: No it doesn't. JavaScript will convert it to a boolean. –  Rocket Hazmat Nov 8 '13 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

The first one is more readable while the second one is not so clear for novice JavaScript developers.

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The 2 options are not equivalent:

  • If a valid data can be an empty string, the boolean false or the number 0 (all "falsy" values) then the second option will not behave as you expect.

  • As you already mentioned, the first option will not raise an error if data is undefined.

So you need to choose the one that actually behaves correctly in your use case.

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Don't use either. Check for data, not absence thereof.

if (data) {
}

This will return true if and only if data holds an object, non-empty string, non-zero/non-NaN (not-a-number) number and Boolean true values.

You can use else for failure scenarios.

Reference for datatypes/variables

Specifically "The Boolean datatype" past half-way down the page.

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Use explicit comparation if (data == null).

(!data) will be true in other cases. When data is 0 or false for example,

Had to learn this the hard way fixing an Infragistics issue

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As you can see from lots of people's answers, implicit type conversion in JavaScript is very confusing.

For example, do you know what !data evaluates to when data is an empty string? It's hard to say. If you know specifically what you think is an error, using the more specific expression seems like the most descriptive way to do that and it will be easier to debug in the future too.

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