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We're always told that a Controller should be skinny and that validation should be done in the Model, not the Controller. But consider the following example.

Here's is a simple Model and Controller for handling the POST from an edit screen, on which we can edit a Person object.

public class PersonEditModel
{         
     [Required(ErrorMessage = "No ID Passed")]
     public int ID { get; set; }

     [Required(ErrorMessage = "First name Required")]
     [StringLength(50,ErrorMessage = "Must be under 50 characters")]
     public string FirstName { get; set; }

     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Last name Required")]
     [StringLength(50,ErrorMessage = "Must be under 50 characters")]
     public string LastName { get; set; }
}

public class PersonController : Controller
{
    // [HttpGet]View, [HttpGet]Edit Controller methods omitted for brevity

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Edit(PersonEditModel model)
    {
        // save changes to the record 
        return RedirectToAction("View", "Person", new { ID = model.ID});
    }
}

The Model performs two kinds of validation here. It validates FirstName and LastName, but it also validates the private key (ID) used to access the record we wish to change. Should this validation be done in the Model also?

What if we then want to expand validation (as we should) to include a check to see if this record exists?

Normally, I would validate this in the controller:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(PersonEditModel model)
{
    using(DatabaseContext db = new DatabaseContext())
    {
         var _person = db.Persons.Where(x => x.ID == model.ID);
         if(_person == null)
         {
             ModelState.AddError("This person does not exist!");
             // not sure how we got here, malicious post maybe. Who knows. 
             // so since the ID is invalid, we return the user to the Person List
             return RedirectToAction("List", Person");
         }
         // save changes
    }
    // if we got here, everything likely worked out fine
    return RedirectToAction("View", "Person", new { ID = model.ID});
}

Is this bad practice? Should I be checking if the record exists in some kind of complex custom validation method in the model? Should I put it somewhere else entirely?

UPDATE

On a related note. Should a ViewModel contain the methods to populate the data?

Which of these is better practice - this

public class PersonViewModel
{    
    public Person person { get; set; }

    public PersonViewModel(int ID){
        using(DatabaseContext db = new DatabaseContext())
        {
             this.person = db.Persons.Where(x => x.ID == ID);
        }
    }
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult View(int ID)
{
    return View("View", new PersonViewModel(ID));
}

Or this?

public class PersonViewModel
{    
    public Person person { get; set; }
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult View(int ID)
{
    PersonViewModel model = new PersonViewModel();  
    using(DatabaseContext db = new DatabaseContext())
    {
         model.person = db.Persons.Where(x => x.ID == ID);
    }
    return View("View", model);
}
share|improve this question
    
What you're doing in the last example isn't what I would call validation. The PersonEditModel is still valid. The problem is that the person doesn't exist. That's a different error and is properly handled in the controller. – Justin Niessner Nov 8 '13 at 16:43
    
It looks fine, no issues. If some one says no, ask the reason pls :) – Murali Murugesan Nov 8 '13 at 16:44
    
So this should be in the controller then? – roryok Nov 8 '13 at 16:44
    
I don't see anything wrong, that's the way I did it. But I could be wrong. I would replace find person code in another function (FindPersonByID). You could then call this in controller and throw an exception, else call the save method. – Vishal Nov 8 '13 at 16:45
1  
Wouldnt this be a better topic for CodeReview? – paqogomez Nov 8 '13 at 16:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When we talk about Model, it includes your DAL and your business layer. For small apps or demos it is not unusual to see that kind of code in a controller, but normally you should give that role to the business or data layer :

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(PersonEditModel model)
{
    // Validation round one, using attributes defined on your properties
    // The model binder checks for you if required fields are submitted, with correct length
    if(ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // Validation round two, we push our model to the business layer
        var errorMessage = this.personService.Update(model);

        // some error has returned from the business layer
        if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(errorMessage))
        {
            // Error is added to be displayed to the user
            ModelState.AddModelError(errorMessage);
        }
        else
        {
            // Update successfull
            return RedirectToAction("View", "Person", new { ID = model.ID});
        }
    }

    // Back to our form with current model values, as they're still in the ModelState
    return View();
}

Here the goal is to free the controller from business logic validation and usage of the data context. It pushes submitted data and is notified if errors occurred. I used a string variable, but you can implement error management as you like. Evolving your business rules won't impact your controller at all.

share|improve this answer

I generally prefer FluentValidation for all purposes. It also has a Nuget to install it out-of the box in VS.

Sample Validation Code from here:

using FluentValidation;

public class CustomerValidator: AbstractValidator<Customer> {
  public CustomerValidator() {
    RuleFor(customer => customer.Surname).NotEmpty();
    RuleFor(customer => customer.Forename).NotEmpty().WithMessage("Please specify a first name");
    RuleFor(customer => customer.Discount).NotEqual(0).When(customer => customer.HasDiscount);
    RuleFor(customer => customer.Address).Length(20, 250);
    RuleFor(customer => customer.Postcode).Must(BeAValidPostcode).WithMessage("Please specify a valid postcode");
  }

  private bool BeAValidPostcode(string postcode) {
    // custom postcode validating logic goes here
  }
}

Customer customer = new Customer();
CustomerValidator validator = new CustomerValidator();
ValidationResult results = validator.Validate(customer);

bool validationSucceeded = results.IsValid;
IList<ValidationFailure> failures = results.Errors;

See?? It is very easy to validate any kind of models with Fluent Validation with clean methods. You can consider going through FluentValidation Documentation.

Where to validate?

Suppose you have a model as below:

public class Category
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    virtual public ICollection<Image> Images { get; set; }
}

then, you will define another validator model in a similar class library or preferably a new class library that handles validation for all the models in the project.

public class CategoryValidator : AbstractValidator<Category>
{
    public CategoryValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Name).NotEmpty().WithMessage("Category name is required.");
    }
}

So, you can do it in a separate validator model keeping your methods and domain models as clean as possible.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is about where to validate. – Murali Murugesan Nov 8 '13 at 16:45
    
I have used FluentValidation before and it certainly helps with more complex cases, but it doesn't really answer the question. Is checking for the existence of records in the model a good or a bad idea? – roryok Nov 8 '13 at 16:46
    
@roryok I don't think you have really used FluentValidation before, as FluentValidation works outof the box, if you have set validator for particular model, then it will be automatically invoked, provided you have injected IValidator in your interfaces. – Bhushan Firake Nov 8 '13 at 16:55
    
@Murali,@roryok Updated my answer – Bhushan Firake Nov 8 '13 at 16:59

There's absolutely nothing wrong with this. Your controllers are responsible for directing the flow of control when it comes to which view to be shown to your users. Part of doing that is ensuring that a view is getting a model that is in a usable state.

The controller doesn't care what the model is, or what the model contains, but it does care that it's valid. It's why ModelState.IsValid is so important, because the controller doesn't have to know how that validation is performed or what directly makes a model valid. Typically, any validation that needs to take place after ModelState.IsValid, can be pushed to another layer of your application, which again enforces separation-of-concerns.

share|improve this answer

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