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I have a question about MVVM in WPF that is driving me batty.

Why do something like this:?

MainWindow.xaml:

<Window x:Class="MVVMProject.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <Grid>
        <ContentControl Content="{Binding}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Have your ExampleView.xaml set up as:

<ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:vms="clr-namespace:MVVMProject.ViewModels">
    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vms:ExampleVM}" >
        <Grid>
            <ActualContent/>
        </Grid>
    </DataTemplate>
</ResourceDictionary>

And create the window like this:

public partial class App : Application {

    protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e) {

        base.OnStartup(e);

        MainWindow app = new MainWindow();
        ExampleVM context = new ExampleVM();
        app.DataContext = context;
        app.Show();
    }
}

When you can do it like this:?

App.xaml: (Set startup window/View)

<Application x:Class="MVVMProject.App"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    StartupUri="ExampleView.xaml">
</Application>

ExampleView.xaml: (a Window not a ResourceDictionary)

<Window x:Class="MVVMProject.ExampleView"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:vms="clr-namespace:MVVMProject.ViewModels">
    >
    <Window.DataContext>
        <vms:ExampleVM />
    </Window.DataContext>

    <Grid>
        <ActualContent/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Essentially it's "View as DataTemplate" (VaD) vs. "View as Window" (VaW)

Here is my understanding of the comparison: (Note I use VS 2008 so I lack Blendability &/or other stuff)

  • VaD: Lets you switch Views without closing the window. (This is not desirable for my project)
  • VaD: VM knows absolutely nothing about the View, whereas in VaW it (only) has to be able to instantiate it when opening another window
  • VaW: I can actually see my xaml rendered in the Designer (I can't with VaD, at least in my current setup)
  • VaW: Works intuitively with opening and closing windows; each window has (is) a corresponding View (and ViewModel)
  • VaD: ViewModel can pass along initial window width, height, resizability etc. through properties (whereas in VaW they are directly set in the Window)
  • VaW: Can set FocusManager.FocusedElement (not sure how in VaD)
  • VaW: Less files, since my window types (e.g. Ribbon, Dialog) are incorporated into their Views

So what's going on here? Can't I just build my windows in XAML, access their data cleanly through properties of the VM, and be done with it? The code-behind is the same (virtually nil). I'm struggling to understand why I should shuffle all the View stuff into a ResourceDictionary. ( But I don't want to do it wrong ;-) )


Does it even matter? Is there something I've missed? Thanks a lot for reading. :O


Thanks to Rachel Lim and Nick Polyak for my blossoming understanding of MVVM

Edit: Minor flow change

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Think like this: ViewModels shall be displayed either in Windows or UserControls. Poco's shall be displayed in DataTemplates. :) –  dev hedgehog Nov 8 '13 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

People use DataTemplates that way when they want to dynamically switch Views depending on the ViewModel:

<Window>
    <Window.Resources>
       <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:VM1}">
          <!-- View 1 Here -->
       </DataTemplate>

       <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:VM2}">
          <!-- View 2 here -->
       </DataTemplate>
    <Window.Resources>

    <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding}"/>

</Window>

So,

if Window.DataContext is an instance of VM1, then View1 will be displayed,

and if

Window.DataContext is an instance of VM2, then View2 will be displayed.

Granted, it makes no sense at all if only 1 View is expected, and never changed.

I hope this is clear enough :P

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That is clear, thank you @HighCore –  Simon F Nov 8 '13 at 18:16

From my personal experience: Both work models are aviables, depending of what you want, and depending of the application requirements. The idea behind VaD is decopling the content, and the container. If you implement VaD you can use this template (by default) when ever you show any item of this type. You can use it in ItemsControls (lists, listviews, grids, etc) and in ContentControls only making bindings. Like you said, VaD works for switching the window's content with out closing and opening a new. Also you can define the view using UserControls, then you take control if focused elements, and also you can manage code behind. So, your data template may be like this:

<ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:vms="clr-namespace:MVVMProject.ViewModels">
<DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vms:ExampleVM}" >
    <CustomUserControl A="{Binding A}" B="{Binding B}" DataContext="{Binding}" .../>
</DataTemplate>

You also in an UserControl may set dependency properties, thats make easier the job, because allow bindings and decoupling the app.

But of course, if you app doesn't require dynamically content switching, it is fine to use VaW for the main window, or any other window. In fact, you can use both VaW and VaD. This last one can be used for inner items in the app, that doesn't require windows. You shoose what is better for you, depending of application requirements, and the time aviable for developing the app. Hope this personal experience helps...

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Thanks @Raul Otaño for your perspective! –  Simon F Nov 8 '13 at 18:15

Since in VaD the view models know nothing about the views, you can build a fully functioning application entirely made up of view models only and no views. This leads to the possibility of writing an application that can be driven entirely by code. This in turn leads to the possibility of performing integration testing without the GUI. Integration testing through the GUI is notoriously fragile - while testing through view models should be more robust.

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