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I have a server application that creates new thread for every incoming request.

However, every once in a while, it will create a thread with thread ID = 0 (used pthread_equal to check this). I have a structure that contains the thread ID that I pass to the function specified in pthread_create, and am checking this there.

Why would a thread get created with ID = 0? Is there anything I can do if this happens? I cannot use this thread and want to exist it immediately.

=====================================================================

typedef struct 
{
    pthread_t tid;
    other_struct_t Other;
} data_ptr_t;

void * worker(void * arg)
{
    data_ptr_t local_data;
    data_ptr_t * incoming_data = (data_ptr_t *) arg;
    if (NULL == incoming_data || NULL == incoming_data->Other)
    {
        printf("invalid input\n");
    }
    else if (pthread_equal(incoming_data->tid, 0))
    {
        printf("invalid thread id\n");
    }
    else
    {
        // add to global thread pool
        // do other stuff here
        // remove from global thread pool
    }
}

int main()
{
    // server socket stuff
    while (1)
    {
        // if incoming connection is valid
        data_ptr_t data;
        int error = pthread_create(&(data.tid), NULL, (void * (*) (void *)) worker, (void *) &data);
        if (0 != errror)
        {
            printf("could not create thread (%d)\n", error);
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_detach(data.tid);
            printf("thread dispatched\n");
        }
    }
}

Note: If the number of threads I'm creating is under 50 or so, it works fine. Upwards of 70, most threads go through just fine, the rest end up printing the "invalid thread id".

Note: This is on Linux.

share|improve this question
2  
Do you have any example code to illustrate your problem? –  fonZ Nov 8 '13 at 18:13
1  
pthread_t is an opaque type. It is not meaningful nor safe to treat it as an integer. –  pilcrow Nov 8 '13 at 18:18
    
I've added some example code to show the gist of what my application is doing. Please let me know if there's something else you need. –  Sagar Nov 8 '13 at 18:24
    
@pilcrow is there any way to check it's validity? –  Sagar Nov 8 '13 at 18:24
    
Is it on windows ? –  user2533527 Nov 8 '13 at 18:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't do this:

while (1)
{
    // if incoming connection is valid
    data_ptr_t data;
    int error = pthread_create(&(data.tid), 
        NULL, (void * (*) (void *)) worker, (void *) &data);

your data_ptr_t is a local variable on the stack. On the next iteration of the while loop, that variable is destroyed/gone/not-valid.

The while loop might start another iteration long before the new worker thread starts running and makes use of the data you pass to it. Instead, dynamically allocate the data you pass to the worker thread so you can be sure it's still valid.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 ... and call pthread_self() if the worker needs to know its own thread ID! –  pilcrow Nov 8 '13 at 18:36
    
That was it! Such a stupid oversight...thank you so much! –  Sagar Nov 12 '13 at 19:38

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