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What is the best way to store/retrieve a DateTime value that is created by an application with a specific local date and time, stored in a database on a server that may be in a different time zone, then retrieved by other devices in a different time zone, where those devices need to interpret the DateTime value with the same local time as originally entered? For example, a user in the PST time zone creates an event that is supposed to occur on 1/1/10 at 8:00 AM; that event's date time is stored on a server; then a user in the EST time zone retrieves the DateTime and also interprets the event as occurring at 1/1/10 at 8:00 AM, NOT at 11:00 AM.

The current implementation creates a DateTime with the local time zone, but when the DateTime is uploaded to the server using Windows Services, the DateTime gets converted to the server's local time zone before it gets stored in the DB.

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3 Answers 3

Assuming you do actually know both time zones involved, you can use TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTime. If you don't always know the two time zones involved, of course, you're stuffed...

Storing the instant in UTC as suggested elsewhere is a good idea in many scenarios - it doesn't work when you need to capture the idea of "3pm every day" or something similar though.

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Yes, the "3pm every day" is the type of scenario I'm dealing with. It seems like I'm faced with two options: store the date/time in UTC and also store the timezone of the client so that clients in other time zones can convert the UTC time appropriately; store the date only (midnight for that date) then store the number of hours/minutes from midnight that the date/time should represent as a separate item in the db. Make sense? –  Ted Shaffer Dec 31 '09 at 19:32
    
@Ted: Yes, absolutely. When Noda Time (code.google.com/p/noda-time) is finished this should be somewhat easier for you :) If you give more details of the exact situation you're in, I could advise more specifically. –  Jon Skeet Dec 31 '09 at 20:11

Convert them to UTC and pass them around. If you need the time zone of the originator too, you'll have to store that information too. You can use a DateTimeOffset structure for that purpose in .NET and datetimeoffset data type in SQL Server.

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Store them all as universal time, and convert to the local time zone on view. You'll find ToUniversalTime and ToLocalTime helpful. Here's the example code from MSDN:

        System.Console.WriteLine("Enter a date and time.");

        string strDateTime = System.Console.ReadLine();

        System.DateTime localDateTime;
        try {
            localDateTime = System.DateTime.Parse(strDateTime);
        }
        catch (System.FormatException) {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Invalid format.");
            return;
        }

        System.DateTime univDateTime = localDateTime.ToUniversalTime();

        System.Console.WriteLine("{0} local time is {1} universal time.",
                                 localDateTime,
                                 univDateTime); 

        System.Console.WriteLine("Enter a date and time in universal time.");
        strDateTime = System.Console.ReadLine();

        try {
            univDateTime = System.DateTime.Parse(strDateTime);
        }
        catch (System.FormatException) {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Invalid format.");
            return;
        }

        localDateTime = univDateTime.ToLocalTime();

        System.Console.WriteLine("{0} universal time is {1} local time.",
                                 univDateTime,
                                 localDateTime); 
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1  
ToLocalTime always uses the machine's current time zone - it doesn't let you specify a particular time zone, annoyingly. Fortunately .NET 3.5 improved things significantly with TimeZoneInfo. –  Jon Skeet Dec 31 '09 at 18:46
    
Good point. It also only pays attention to the current DST adjustment rules, not past rules, so for old dates it may get the conversion wrong. The TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTime method you suggested doesn't seem to have that failing. –  jball Dec 31 '09 at 18:49

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