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What is the meaning of destroying local variable:

void f()
{      
   int x=10;     
}

when that function calls, end of function that local variable x will be what?

And for:

void f2()
{
  int a=100;
  int* b=&a;
}

End of f2() what will be that local variable int* b' value? b pointer will be dangling pointer (will have address but no any value in it)?

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you do not have any delete, and since you don't new, there is no memory leaks. –  crashmstr Nov 8 '13 at 19:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

when that function calls, end of function that local variable x will be what?

Nonexistent. Evaportated. Vapor. Gone.

x here is a variable with automatic lifetime. "Automatic" refers to the fact that when x goes out of scope, it will be destroyed. (Not exactly deleted, as that term implies calling delete)

The same is true of all automatic variables, wherether they be integrals, strings, floats, or even pointers:

void f2()
{
  int a=100;
  int* b=&a;
}

Here both a and b are automatic variables. They will both be destroyed at the end of their scope -- the end of f2(). However, all that will be destroyed is the varible itself. If an automatic variable is a pointer (eg, a raw pointer), then the thing the pointer points to will not be destroyed. Consider:

void f3()
{
  char* p = new char [256];
}

p here is still an automatic variable, of type pointer-to-char. The thing p points to is not automatic -- that is dynamically allocated (we used new).

As written above, p will be destroyed but the memory it points to will not. This is a memory leak. In order to resolve this, you must delete it:

void f3()
{
  char* p = new char [256];
  delete [] p;
}

Now the memory pointed to by p has been correctly destroyed, and the pointer itself (p) will be destroyed at the end of its scope since it's an automatic.

The lifetime of p and what p points to are not connected in any way. Just because you delete p doesn't mean that p itself is now also destroyed. p is still an automatic variable.

An example:

void f3()
{
  char* p = new char [256];
  cout << (void*) p << "\n"
  delete [] p;
  // p still exists, it just points to to nothing useable
  cout << (void*) p << "\n"
}

After the delete, we print the value of p to the screen. If you run this, you'll see that the value of p doesn't change from before deleteing it. p itself was unaffected by delete [] p;. But at f3()'s closing brace }, it will fall out of scope and there be destroyed.

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I dont understand, using delete will delete pointed value, but still there will be pointed address. so after delete[] that pointed address will be deleted becouse of end of scope? –  Vito Carleone Nov 8 '13 at 19:34
    
@VitoCarleone: Almost. Let me elaborate a bit further. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:35
    
@VitoCarleone: Edited. Does that help? –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:39
    
yeap thanks it help;) –  Vito Carleone Nov 8 '13 at 19:41
    
but what if in my question, f() returns that x value, so when i call it end of scope it will be destroyed, so i will get a destroyed value, not 10 ? –  Vito Carleone Nov 8 '13 at 19:43
  1. The local variable is allocated automatically for you on the stack, and is automatically released (hence destroyed) when you exit the scope of the function.
  2. b won't be a dangling pointer, since you did not allocate any memory on the heap (using malloc or new, it's merely a pointer to the address of the local variable a (that is destroyed when you exit the scope of the function)
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b wont be a dangling pointer, but if that function return type is int* and i return b. now that function returns dangling pointer right? –  Vito Carleone Nov 9 '13 at 11:48

Once the stack frame for that function is popped…you cannot refer those local variables

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"On the stack frame" You don't know that. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:29
    
Nope...thanks for the info –  Vii Nov 8 '13 at 19:32
    
What I mean to say is that the C++ Standard makes no mention of stacks, heaps or anything of the sort. Some systems, like embedded or exotic hardware, might not even have a stack pointer. Since we're not talking about a specific platform here, you can't say that it's on the stack frame, as there is no stack frame in the C++ language itself. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:34
    
Well most c++ compilers make use of stack frame right? Would like to Learn more on this if u can point me to any stack less implementations –  Vii Nov 8 '13 at 19:42
1  
I can't point you to any stackless implementations, as I'm not familiar with any. What I am familiar with is the Standard which described the laguage itself. Yes, most compilers on normal hardware make use of a stack frame. (Actually it's the CPU that uses a stack frame) But C++ itself does not require the hardware to use a stack frame, or even make any allowances specifically for hardware that does. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:47

When f() exits, x won't exist anymore. Technically, the memory that was used for it remains, of course, but the compiler/system is free to use that memory space for whatever it pleases. And it will eventually reuse it for something entirely different.

If you take the address of x and pass it out of the function, dereferencing that pointer is undefined behaviour of the worst kind. Example:

int* f() {
    int a;
    return &a;
}

int main() {
    int* pointer = f();
    //int b = *pointer;    //Undefined behaviour, the compiler could choose to format your harddrive now!
}
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" the memory that was used for it remains" You don't know that. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:30
    
@JohnDibling In virtually all cases, it does. You would need to grow your stack massively before calling f(), and shrink it back just as dratically in order for the memory to actually be reclaimed by the system. I'm not even sure if there is actually systems out there that can reclaim stack memory at all. Trying to reclaim stack space would be a very bad idea for a system for performance reasons. –  cmaster Nov 8 '13 at 19:35
    
The C++ Standard makes no mention of stacks, heaps, or what happens to the memory after x is reclaimed aside from the fact that it is inaccessible. Since we're not talking about a specific platform here but you are assuming platform specifics, your claim is technically incorrect. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '13 at 19:41
    
@JohnDibling My mention of "the memory that was used for it remains" had nothing to do with the language standards, it was simply based on the fact that physical memory cannot evaporate, and that memory mapped into the virtual address space of a process seldomly disappears. That's why I used words like "technically" and "memory"... –  cmaster Nov 8 '13 at 19:45

The variables x, a, and b are all local variables, so they cease to exist after the function returns. If you try to ask what the value of any of them is, a debugger would probably say something like "Couldn't find x in this context."

In more detail, the memory for those variables was allocated from the stack, and is returned to the stack when the function returned. Calling f() essentially placed the value 10 just above the top of the stack; if you then create another int on the stack uninitialized, it will probably start with the value 10 (you shouldn't rely on this behavior, since it isn't guaranteed, but it gives you a basic idea of how the stack works on many systems).

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You're not destroying anything, your variables go out of scope.

Since its not heap allocated, you wouldn't have any issues with respect to memory management.

If you really want to learn the mechanics of such mechanisms, you can always download ollydbg (assuming windows), and step into right before, during and after the execution of this function, in order to understand how modern programming languages & compilers treat local variables.

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The pointer itself will also go out of scope. The pointer f2 gets destroyed at the end of the function, which does in this situation not create a memory leak as the object it's pointing to is on the stack and wasn't created with new.

But if you consider the following situation:

int *global;

void foo()
{
int a = 10;
global = &a;
}

Then the pointer global exists after foo has finished running, but points to a destroyed out-of-scope variable, the value of which is not defined.

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so global is dangling pointer now? –  Vito Carleone Nov 9 '13 at 11:50
    
@VitoCarleone Yes, it is after foo() completes. –  DUman Nov 9 '13 at 13:52

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