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I'm having a bit of trouble figuring out recursion for this specific program. I have tried a few different options, but I am brand new to recursive functions. The only part of the program I am allowed to modify is inside of the function B. This function calculates: Bn(a) = Bn−1(a) × Bn−2(a), where B1(a) = B2(a) = a. So B1(a) = a | B2(a) = a | B3(a) = a^2 | B4(a) = a^3 | B5(a) = a^5 | etc...

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
float B(float a, int n)
{
   //Here is where I'm having an issue...
}
int main(void)
{ cout << "Input a float a, and an int n > 0: ";
   float a; int n;
   cin >> a >> n;
   cout << "B(" << a << ")_" << n << " = " << B(a,n) << endl;
   return 0;
}
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What happens if you attempt to calculate B(a,n-1)*B(a,n-2)? –  abiessu Nov 8 '13 at 20:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First take care of the cases where n is 1 or 2, which are defined to return a without recursing. These are the so-called termination cases.

float B(float a, int n)
{
   if (n == 1 || n == 2) { return a; }

   // ...
}

Then you recurse for the others, subtracting from n each time:

float B(float a, int n)
{
   if (n == 1 || n == 2) { return a; }

   return B(a, n - 1) * B(a, n - 2);
}

If you pass in an n greater than 2, the recursive calls will eventually reach a termination case and execution will stop at that point, returning the final result all the way back up to the first call.

Let's take an example invocation, B(2, 4). This doesn't match the termination case, so the function will recurse, like so:

  • B(2, 4) will return B(2, 3) * B(2, 2).
  • B(2, 3) will return B(2, 1) * B(2, 2). We replace this in the original, and we get: (B(2, 1) * B(2, 2)) * B(2, 2).
  • All we have left now is termination cases, so we can substitute those by the value of a: (2 * 2) * 2 = 23 = 8.

As far as what actually happens (not just algebraic simplification), this will be the call tree:

  • B(2, 4) is not a termination case, it will call:
    • B(2, 3) is not a termination case, it will call:
      • B(2, 2) is a termination case, returning 2.
      • B(2, 1) is a termination case, returning 2.
      • The return will be 2*2 = 4.
    • B(2, 2) is a termination case, returning 2.
    • The return will be 4*2 = 8.
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I see, I wasn't sure how to account for the special cases where n=1 ,n=2. Can you explain how the recursion works by using the "return B..." method? –  user2359675 Nov 8 '13 at 20:07
    
@user2359675 Recursion is simply a function calling itself, which is what happens here. The function calls itself twice, with a lower value of n each time. I have amended my answer with an example invocation. –  cdhowie Nov 8 '13 at 20:08

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