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I have found this vertical centring method which seems pretty common..

 #container {
 width: 960px;
 height: 740px;
 position: absolute;
 top: 50%;
 left: 50%;
 margin-left: -480px;
 margin-top: -370px;
 }

What I'm trying to center here is the entire site, and this code goes perfectly as expected when the screen preview is larger than the div height (larger than 740px). However, Once the browser window is minimized less than div's vertical size (740px) parts of the header disappear above the top of the page.

I can sort of understand why this is happening seeing that 50% becomes less than half the div's size which will be equalized with margin-top. What I'm looking for is a fix for this issue? Or even a completely different method, I just need to center the site both vertically and horizontally.

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3 Answers 3

try this:

#container {
  height: 740px;
  width: 960px;
  position: absolute;
  margin: auto;
  top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0;
}

By the way, Smashing Magazine recently published a nice article about this.

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You need to add a media query:

@media screen and (min-height:740px) {
    #container {
        top:0;
        margin-top:0;
    }
}

This will only apply the formatting where the screen is at least 740px tall. If you want to learn more about media queries, check http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-mediaqueries/

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Absolute Centering like Lino Rosa mentioned is the best approach here for easy horizontal and vertical centering while allowing you to add some responsive touches, like fixing your height issue.

Ideally, you should be using percentages for the width and height declarations so that your content will vary with the viewport. Of course, sometimes you just need pixels :-)

Here's what I've done:

.Absolute-Center {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0;
  margin: auto;
}

#container {
  width: 960px;
  max-width: 90%;
  height: 740px;
  max-height: 90%;
  overflow: auto;
}

By setting a max-height and max-width, the box will never be more than 90% of the container (in this case, the browser viewport) even if it's less than 960px wide or 740px tall, so even small screens see a nice centered box. overflow: auto ensures that if the content is longer than the box, the user can scroll in the box to see the rest.

View the demo


If you must have the box exactly 960px by 740px no matter the screen size (forcing the user to scroll around to see all of the content on a small window), then only apply the Absolute Centering styles to #container using a media query, like so:

#container { 
  width: 960px;
  height: 740px;
  overflow: auto;
  margin: auto; 
}

@media screen and (min-height:740px) and (min-width: 960px) {
  #container {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0;
  }
}

View the demo

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