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My end goal is to use protobuf-net and GZipStream in an attempt to compress a List<MyCustomType> object to store in a varbinary(max) field in SQL Server. I'm working on unit tests to understand how everything works and fits together.

Target .NET framework is 3.5.

My current process is:

  1. Serialize the data with protobuf-net (good).
  2. Compress the serialized data from #1 with GZipStream (good).
  3. Convert the compressed data to a base64 string (good).

At this point, the value from step #3 will be stored in a varbinary(max) field. I have no control over this. The steps resume with needing to take a base64 string and deserialize it to a concrete type.

  1. Convert a base 64 string to a byte[] (good).
  2. Decompress the data with GZipStream (good).
  3. Deserialize the data with protobuf-net (bad).

Can someone assist with why the call to Serializer.Deserialize<string> returns null? I'm stuck on this one and hopefully a fresh set of eyes will help.

FWIW, I tried another version of this using List<T> where T is a custom class I created and I Deserialize<> still returns null.

FWIW 2, data.txt is a 4MB plaintext file residing on my C:.

    [Test]
    public void ForStackOverflow()
    {
        string data = "hi, my name is...";
        //string data = File.ReadAllText(@"C:\Temp\data.txt");

        string serializedBase64;

        using (MemoryStream protobuf = new MemoryStream())
        {
            Serializer.Serialize(protobuf, data);

            using (MemoryStream compressed = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (GZipStream gzip = new GZipStream(compressed, CompressionMode.Compress))
                {
                    byte[] s = protobuf.ToArray();
                    gzip.Write(s, 0, s.Length);
                    gzip.Close();
                }

                serializedBase64 = Convert.ToBase64String(compressed.ToArray());
            }
        }

        byte[] base64byteArray = Convert.FromBase64String(serializedBase64);

        using (MemoryStream base64Stream = new MemoryStream(base64byteArray))
        {
            using (GZipStream gzip = new GZipStream(base64Stream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
            {
                using (MemoryStream plainText = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
                    int read;

                    while ((read = gzip.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
                    {
                        plainText.Write(buffer, 0, read);
                    }

                    // why does this call to Deserialize return null?
                    string deserialized = Serializer.Deserialize<string>(plainText);

                    Assert.IsNotNull(deserialized);
                    Assert.AreEqual(data, deserialized);
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
You know that in the case of a string you're adding overhead at each step, right? But... looking –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '13 at 21:31
    
Goal is to get the smallest possible value to store in the database. Current problem is that we serialize a List<CustomType> with about 10K items to XML and store in the database. This has balloon'd to about 4MB per row in the table. I'm open to alternate suggestions but I have a couple things I can't get around. #1, the SQL Server field is VARBINARY and #2, the method used to write to that field requires a string. –  Ryan Rodemoyer Nov 8 '13 at 21:36
    
just to be clear: protobuf-net will do a fair job on CustomType, but it isn't very optimal at just storing string data by itself. Also: the base-64 step seems very odd to me... if you want to store varbinary data - why do you need base-64? –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '13 at 22:05
    
I am using base64 because the only method I have available to store to the VARBINARY field requires a string. Do you have an alternate suggestion on how to get the data from the MemoryStream to a string besides base64? –  Ryan Rodemoyer Nov 8 '13 at 22:21
    
@Rodemoyer no, base-64 would be my suggestion. It just seems... Unfortunate. –  Marc Gravell Nov 9 '13 at 8:00
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because you didn't rewind plainText after writing to it. Actually, that entire Stream is unnecessary - this works:

using (MemoryStream base64Stream = new MemoryStream(base64byteArray))
{
    using (GZipStream gzip = new GZipStream(
        base64Stream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
    {
        string deserialized = Serializer.Deserialize<string>(gzip);

        Assert.IsNotNull(deserialized);
        Assert.AreEqual(data, deserialized);
    }
}

Likewise, this should work for the serialize:

using (MemoryStream compressed = new MemoryStream())
{
    using (GZipStream gzip = new GZipStream(
        compressed, CompressionMode.Compress, true))
    {
        Serializer.Serialize(gzip, data);
    }

    serializedBase64 = Convert.ToBase64String(
        compressed.GetBuffer(), 0, (int)compressed.Length);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing, that all worked perfect and I appreciate you showing how much I could condense what was going on. The only thing is that the call to Convert.ToBase64String throws ObjectDisposedException and that is because how GZipStream is works in conjunction with MemoryStream. You must use ToArray() in that situation. –  Ryan Rodemoyer Nov 8 '13 at 21:48
    
@RyanRodemoyer then specify leaveOpen - see edit –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '13 at 21:56
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