Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array

my @stuff = (6.5,6.54,6.465,6.3,6.42,8.07370,8.1165,8.07612,7.61855,6.94927,6.94072,8.09707,6.94468,7.55948,6.93,7.51448,8.02872,6.89643,7.44893,6.92997,7.46780,7.96705,6.93785,6.928,7.51177,7.93443,6.92620,7.40470,7.90602,8.39247,6.95032,7.42932,7.917,6.95272,7.93688,8.42192,6.95255,7.45207,8.43418,7.42768,8.42152,6.9645);

I want to divide this into a smaller arrays where similar numbers can be grouped together without specifying the number of arrays. I want the values within each smaller array should not be more than 0.5 apart.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Kevin Panko, CoverosGene, Alexandre P. Levasseur, Secator, Duck Nov 9 '13 at 19:26

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Kevin Panko, CoverosGene, Alexandre P. Levasseur, Secator, Duck
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I assume that you do not care about the order in your data? –  ceving Nov 8 '13 at 22:03
2  
The wish is not enough, try something. I believe you can do that –  Suic Nov 8 '13 at 22:03
    
ok i got it thanks –  statstar Nov 8 '13 at 23:24

3 Answers 3

This is a simple one. Sounds like an assignment in a perl class. I won't go into detail, but an easy solution would be, to sort the array. Then you iterate and check the difference between the current and the first element. As soon as your current element differs more than your delta (0.5) from the first, you split the array at this position. Then you start again with the shortened array.

There are many variations on how to do this. I am sure you will come up with a smart one.

share|improve this answer
my @stuff = (6.5,6.54,6.465,6.3,6.42,8.07370,8.1165,8.07612,7.61855,6.94927,6.94072,8.09707,6.94468,7.55948,6.93,7.51448,8.02872,6.89643,7.44893,6.92997,7.46780,7.96705,6.93785,6.928,7.51177,7.93443,6.92620,7.40470,7.90602,8.39247,6.95032,7.42932,7.917,6.95272,7.93688,8.42192,6.95255,7.45207,8.43418,7.42768,8.42152,6.9645);
my (%h, @g);

my @r = map {
  my $el = $_;
  my ($ref) = map { abs($_-$el) <=0.5 ? $h{$_} : () } @g;

  if ($ref) { push @$ref, $_; }
  else {
    $h{$_} = [$_];
    push @g, $_;
  }
  $ref ? () : $h{$_};
}
sort { $a <=> $b }
@stuff;

use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \@r;

output

$VAR1 = [
      [
        '6.3',
        '6.42',
        '6.465',
        '6.5',
        '6.54'
      ],
      [
        '6.89643',
        '6.9262',
        '6.928',
        '6.92997',
        '6.93',
        '6.93785',
        '6.94072',
        '6.94468',
        '6.94927',
        '6.95032',
        '6.95255',
        '6.95272',
        '6.9645'
      ],
      [
        '7.4047',
        '7.42768',
        '7.42932',
        '7.44893',
        '7.45207',
        '7.4678',
        '7.51177',
        '7.51448',
        '7.55948',
        '7.61855'
      ],
      [
        '7.90602',
        '7.917',
        '7.93443',
        '7.93688',
        '7.96705',
        '8.02872',
        '8.0737',
        '8.07612',
        '8.09707',
        '8.1165',
        '8.39247'
      ],
      [
        '8.42152',
        '8.42192',
        '8.43418'
      ]
    ];
share|improve this answer

This is a common clustering problem. You should take a look at clustering algorithms like

k-means or k-median for the clustering part and k-means++ to get a good k (number of clusters)

Be aware that my suggestion is more complicated than the ones from the other answers, but if you'd like to dig deeper into such algorithms and need solutions for not only the 0.5 delta, these are some points to start.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.