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I'm using PowerMock (Mockito) to mock a subcall to another method in the same class. More specifically I have something like this:

public class myClass{
    public void MyMethod1(){
        //do something
        try{
            myMethod2();
        } catch (MyExceptionType e) {
            //do something
            throw e;
        }
    }

    public int MyMethod2() throws MyExceptionType {...}
}

Now in my unit tests, I'm able to mock responses of MyMethod2 using a spy, and doing something like doReturn(1).when(myClass).myMethod2(). However, something strange happens when I do something like this: doThrow(myExeptionType).when(myClass).myMethod2(). When I call myClass.myMethod1() during my test, it throws a NullPointerException, but the strange bit is that if I use a debugger and inspect throw e, e is the correct exception of type MyExceptionType.

Here's the stack trace of that NullPointerException:

java.lang.NullPointerException
    at java.util.Arrays$ArrayList.<init>(Arrays.java:2842)
    at java.util.Arrays.asList(Arrays.java:2828)
    at org.mockito.internal.exceptions.stacktrace.StackTraceFilter.filter(StackTraceFilter.java:31)
    at org.mockito.internal.exceptions.stacktrace.ConditionalStackTraceFilter.filter(ConditionalStackTraceFilter.java:23)
    at org.mockito.internal.invocation.realmethod.FilteredCGLIBProxyRealMethod.invoke(FilteredCGLIBProxyRealMethod.java:29)
    at org.mockito.internal.invocation.InvocationImpl.callRealMethod(InvocationImpl.java:108)
    at org.mockito.internal.stubbing.answers.CallsRealMethods.answer(CallsRealMethods.java:36)
    at org.mockito.internal.handler.MockHandlerImpl.handle(MockHandlerImpl.java:93)
    at org.mockito.internal.handler.NullResultGuardian.handle(NullResultGuardian.java:29)
    at org.mockito.internal.handler.InvocationNotifierHandler.handle(InvocationNotifierHandler.java:38)
    at org.mockito.internal.creation.MethodInterceptorFilter.intercept(MethodInterceptorFilter.java:51)
    at com.amazon.inventory.workflow.common.wrapper.FCContainerServiceWrapper$$EnhancerByMockitoWithCGLIB$$a0f00456.getContainerHierarchyDown(<generated>)
    at com.amazon.inventory.workflow.common.wrapper.containerservice.GetContainerHierarchyDownTest.runTest(GetContainerHierarchyDownTest.java:50)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:606)
    at org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod$1.runReflectiveCall(FrameworkMethod.java:45)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.model.ReflectiveCallable.run(ReflectiveCallable.java:15)
    at org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod.invokeExplosively(FrameworkMethod.java:42)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.statements.InvokeMethod.evaluate(InvokeMethod.java:20)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.statements.RunBefores.evaluate(RunBefores.java:28)
    at org.powermock.modules.junit4.rule.PowerMockStatement.evaluate(PowerMockRule.java:49)
    at org.junit.rules.ExpectedException$ExpectedExceptionStatement.evaluate(ExpectedException.java:110)
    at org.junit.rules.RunRules.evaluate(RunRules.java:18)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.runLeaf(ParentRunner.java:263)
    at org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.runChild(BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.java:68)
    at org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.runChild(BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.java:47)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$3.run(ParentRunner.java:231)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$1.schedule(ParentRunner.java:60)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.runChildren(ParentRunner.java:229)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.access$000(ParentRunner.java:50)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$2.evaluate(ParentRunner.java:222)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.run(ParentRunner.java:300)
    at org.junit.runners.Suite.runChild(Suite.java:128)
    at org.junit.runners.Suite.runChild(Suite.java:24)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$3.run(ParentRunner.java:231)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$1.schedule(ParentRunner.java:60)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.runChildren(ParentRunner.java:229)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.access$000(ParentRunner.java:50)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$2.evaluate(ParentRunner.java:222)
    at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.run(ParentRunner.java:300)
    at org.junit.runner.JUnitCore.run(JUnitCore.java:148)
    at com.intellij.junit4.JUnit4IdeaTestRunner.startRunnerWithArgs(JUnit4IdeaTestRunner.java:77)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.junit.JUnitStarter.prepareStreamsAndStart(JUnitStarter.java:195)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.junit.JUnitStarter.main(JUnitStarter.java:63)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:606)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.application.AppMain.main(AppMain.java:120)

Hopefully my question is not too confusing, thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
I'm a bit confused. When you say you do something like doThrow(myExeptionType), do you mean you have instantiated a variable myExeptionType? If so, what is its value? Or do you mean you wrote MyExceptionType.class? Could you please post EXACTLY the code that's causing you the problem, so we can reproduce it; rather than just describing it? Thanks. – David Wallace Nov 9 '13 at 1:58
    
I also find your use of upper case and lower case confusing. You have written both myMethod2 and MyMethod2 for the same method, which suggests that what you've posted isn't the actual code that gives you the problem. You also used lower case for myClass. Maybe it's not relevant, but the non-standard use of upper and lower case does make your example harder to follow. – David Wallace Nov 9 '13 at 2:01
    
Also, your stack trace suggests that you're using an ExpectedException rule. You haven't shown us this. Can you do so please? It might impact on what's going on here. – David Wallace Nov 9 '13 at 2:03
    
Sorry that my question was confusing. I've found that the issue resides in the fact that mockito is trying to get my mocked exception's stackTrace, which is null, and then tries to filter that which results in a NPE. I'll provide that as an answer in hopes that it might help someone else. – Nepoxx Nov 12 '13 at 18:57
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your comments and subsequent answer have revealed the problem. You're trying to mock your exception object. Mockito was not designed to be able to do this. The reason is that exceptions are generally considered to be value objects. They carry around information - a message, a stack trace, sometimes a reference to a second exception; but as a general rule, they don't actually have any functionality.

The purpose of mocking any class is to get an object that has none of its own functionality, that is, none of its methods do anything, except where explicitly implemented within the test. But an exception already fits that criterion, so there is nothing to be gained by mocking it. The advice at http://www.mockobjects.com/2007/04/test-smell-everything-is-mocked.html is good advice indeed.

So, you have a couple of options, both of which will solve your problem nicely.

(1) Create a real exception and use that in your test. Depending on what constructors MyException has, this might look like this.

MyException toThrow = new MyException("testing");
doThrow(toThrow).when(someMock).someMethod();

(2) Let Mockito create the exception object for you, by just specifying its class in the doThrow call.

doThrow(MyException.class).when(someMock).someMethod();
share|improve this answer

I've found that the issue resided in the fact that mockito tries to filter out the stack trace of the exception thrown to remove the "EnhancedByMockito" strings appended to mocked class names. So basically I was doing this:

MyClass mySpy = Mockito.spy(MyClass.class);
MyException mockedException = Mockito.mock(MyException.class);
doThrow(mockedException).when(mySpy).someMethod();

Of course, in this example, mockedException.getStackTrace() would return null, which would then generate a null pointer exception when Mockito tried to filter the stack trace.

Hopefully this clarifies my question and could end up being useful to someone else.

To solve the issue, I simply mocked a stack trace for my exception like so:

throwableException = (Exception) mock(Class.forName(exceptionToThrow));
StackTraceElement[] mockedStackTrace = new StackTraceElement[0];
when(throwableException.getStackTrace()).thenReturn(mockedStackTrace);
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, so you're saying that the issue is that you mocked the exception type. Why would you do that? Surely a better answer would be "don't mock the exception type"? – David Wallace Nov 12 '13 at 19:41
    
I guess that's more of a "philosophical" question about the approach since in the end both work. I want to unit test that method, and that method only, and mocking ANY dependencies. Maybe I'm being too strict about how I approach unit tests? – Nepoxx Nov 12 '13 at 20:36
    
Well, if there's a use case for it, I might be able to persuade the Mockito team to add a doMockAndThrow method, or something similar, that takes care of mocking the stack trace too. So that you'd write doMockAndThrow(ExceptionType.class).when(someMock).someMethod() But to me, it seems that exception classes are "value" classes - they store some data but they don't generally have functionality of their own, and therefore mocking them gains you nothing, and goes against one of the core principles of mocking. – David Wallace Nov 12 '13 at 20:40
    
Now that you've clarified that your issue was "I mocked the exception type", I think I will post my own answer to this question, so that any future people who DO find this question don't think that your answer is the only approach. – David Wallace Nov 12 '13 at 20:42
    
Agreed. I'll even upvote it :) Thanks David! – Nepoxx Nov 12 '13 at 20:43

Remember to assert your exception in your test method. Like by using the JUnit annotation:

@Test(expected = MyExceptionType.class)
share|improve this answer

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