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I have a bunch of variables declared as 2D arrays:

int[][] array1 = {{}};
int[][] array2 = {{}};
etc..

I'm currently using a method to invoke another method with one of the variables as a parameter with a switch:

public void invokeMethod(){
switch(variableNumber){
    case 1: method(piece1);
    break;
    case 2: method(piece2);
    break;
    etc..
  }
}

This feels like a phenomenally stupid way of approaching this issue, is there a more clever solution? Perhaps storing the variables in an array? What I'd like to do, in case I'm faced with thousands of 2D arrays, is invoking the method with the value of a variable of a different data type, like this:

String arrayToBeInvokedWith = "array1";

method(arrayToBeInvokedWith){
}

(Yes, I do know this is too simplistic, but you can get the idea from it)

Is there a similar solution? Any feedback is much appreciated.

EDIT: All of the arrays have a same size.

share|improve this question
    
I think you have a design problem here. As a rule of thumb, the method's body should not be aware of the scope outside it unless the scope is somehow provided as argument. If you have a method that operates on different int[][] and needs to operate differently based on the Object's reference, you should pass a second argument specifying the context, then act upon that argument inside the method. –  Mena Nov 8 '13 at 23:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of declaring a bunch of individual arrays...

Write a class that encapsulates an instance of a two dimensional array.

If you then use a generic collection whose type is your special array class, you can put all the instances of your arrays into a single collection.

Then when you need to operate on your arrays, you can just iterate over the collections.

Or if it is important to have a particular identity associated with each of your 2D array objects, then associate the identity as the object's key in a HashMap. Then when you need to operate on whichever array, you can retrieve it from the map by using its key.

In place of

public void invokeMethod(){
    switch(variableNumber){
        case 1: method(piece1);
            break;
        case 2: method(piece2);
            break;
        :
        :
    }
}

you can simply use something like

public <T extends MyArrayClass> void invokeMethod(String arrKey, HashMap<String,T>
        arrays) {
    T my2dArray = arrays.get(arrKey);
    method(my2dArray);
    :
    :
}

When confronted with a problem like yours, the solution is often to create a new type that represents an abstraction for your data.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, that looks perfect! Thanks! –  e to the i times pi Nov 8 '13 at 23:32
    
HashMap may be overkill, but the key is to define a data type that serves as an abstraction for your data. You can use an array or a List or whatever is best for your needs. I think what you don't want to do is declare a bunch of 2d arrays and then use one great big switch on them. –  scottb Nov 8 '13 at 23:35

You really need to use a array? You can use a HashMap to store a key refering one array. To get one array, you just pass the key of an array and get it.

HashMap<String, int[]> hashMap = new HashMap<String, int[]>();

int array1[] = {1, 2};
int array2[] = {2, 3};
int array3[] = {3, 4};

hashMap.put("array1", array1);
hashMap.put("array2", array2);
hashMap.put("array3", array3);

int arrayWanted[] = hashMap.get("array2");
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