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Sometimes me have indicated that you can not put a return in the middle of a conditional or a loop, because it breaks the process. However, now have indicated to me that if you can do, and is better. I'm confused. Usually would happen in a function

Can you put a return? Is not it? Why? Or doesn't it make any difference?

Example:

if (i == 0)
{
    //other code
    return true;
}
else
{
    //other code
    return false;
}

or

if (i == 0)
{
    //other code
    b= true;
}
else
{
    //other code
    b= false;
}
return b;
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marked as duplicate by Mitch Wheat, Steve P., Matt Ball, P.Brian.Mackey, rene Nov 9 '13 at 13:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
    
@leoledmag, what does this statement mean: "others have indicated to me that if you can do and better." ? Your wording seems a little confusing, may be you can clarify? –  Bruce Dean Nov 9 '13 at 2:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your two examples are basically equivalent in functionality, and either will work. In fact, an optimizing compiler may easily turn your second example into your first.

Most programmers would likely prefer the first as the intent is clearer.

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I hope the example is not the real intent of his question. In the long complex routines, it might cause confusion and forgetting to cleanup all the cases and eventually leaking memory etc. –  joe Nov 9 '13 at 2:07
    
@joe Good point although this really depends on the language - the question is marked both C and C# and that makes a big difference as C# has constructs that can enforce cleanup regardless of how the function exits. By contrast, at least in C, it can indeed lead to forgotten cleanup. If it's that complex a routine it may be better to break it into multiple functions. –  Kevin Nov 9 '13 at 2:12

It's better to have a single return at the bottom. That way, you have only one point of entry and one point of exit. It is much easier to debug code when you don't have to worry about where it will exit. This is not big deal with very short methods, but for long ones that go on for a few hundred lines, it is much cleaner.

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6  
There's nothing wrong with early return, particularly when used with guards at the start of the function. For long methods that go on for that long, it is much better to break it down into smaller methods. –  Matt Ball Nov 9 '13 at 2:01
    
Agree with that, too. I still think it's best practice to limit points of exit to one point. –  user1646737 Nov 9 '13 at 2:02
1  
You can't agree with my comment and still say that. They're contradictory statements. –  Matt Ball Nov 9 '13 at 2:03
    
Well, then, let's argue, dang it! :-) (I was agreeing to breaking down long methods into a series of smaller ones). –  user1646737 Nov 9 '13 at 2:05
    
Indeed. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure you're objectively wrong about a single return statement being better: stackoverflow.com/questions/36707/… so I'm not sure there's much left to argue. –  Matt Ball Nov 9 '13 at 2:11

I don't see any practical implication of returning in the middle of a loop. If you hear people saying you shouldn't, then it must be on the basis of readability of the code. If you have multiple exit points from the function, it might make some code ugly. Also, most of the time, you have to do some cleanup before exiting the routine. So, generally programmers tend to keep the cleanup routine at one place and always exit through that path. if you have multiple exit points then you have to add the clean up routines in all these places, that makes code duplication and again ruin the readability of the code. I have seen codes with returns spread all over the places and eventually failing to do the clean up properly and causing memory leaks.

The bigger problem is, most of the time the code you write now lives for a long time and the maintainer keeps changing, and at some point people doesn't understand the whole intent of all the lines of code present. that will add in to all these confusion.

All that said, I have seen a lot very beautifully written code with returns in the middle of loops.

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This is a choice of style rather than it being a rule or a matter of performance. The second code example follows the "single entry, single exit" approach, where the code within the function only enters from the top and only exits from the bottom. The idea behind this is that this is more "safe" and easier to follow the code flow. The safety comes into play when you have manually set dynamic storage: with a single point of return, you can ensure that you free all the memory. Of course, languages like java and C# do dynamic storage for you, so this isn't really an issue. Also, if you're exiting multiple times in the middle of a function (particularly if it's very long), it might be hard to keep track of what causes the function to return.

However, choosing to exit only at the bottom of a function can create its own problems, as you may sometimes need to keep track of more state by setting and checking flags.

As for your original question, it certainly does not break anything in modern programming languages; it's all up to you. Go with the way you find easier to follow.

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