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Hi
I am trying to convert the following java binary search routine to as3. I assume that 'compareTo' is a built in java method and that '>>>' s a type of bitwise operation.

Can anyone familiar with both actionscript 3 and Java help with this?

package binary;

public class Finder {

  public static int find( String[ ] keys, String target) {
    int high = keys.length;
    int low = -1;
    while (high - low>1) {
      int probe = (low + high)>>> 1;
      if (keys[probe].compareTo(target) > 0)
        high = probe;
      else
        low = probe;
    }

    if (low==-1 || keys[low].compareTo(target) !=0)
      return -1;
    else
      return low;
  }
}
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1  
The >>> 1 just dividing by 2; no good reason to not just do that. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 31 '09 at 21:37
    
a.compareTo(b) yields a positive number if a > b, 0 if they're equal and a negative number if a < b . –  Carl Smotricz Dec 31 '09 at 21:38
    
I don't know AS so I'm not going to offer an answer. Hope this helps, though. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 31 '09 at 21:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use the built-in Flash features as much as possible. It makes your code easier to maintain and the resulting SWF will be faster and smaller. Check out the indexOf() method on Array.

Is this homework or do you have some other reason for using a hand-written search?

Edit: I should add that the built-in search is a linear search starting with the index you provide. If you have a large and already sorted array, the binary search may be faster. You'll have to experiment where the cross-over is--it could be as low as 10. If your array is not already sorted, the built-in linear search will beat the pants off the combined sort and binary search.

Second Edit: I was curious how large the array had to be for indexOf() to become slower so I ran a few tests. Searching an array of 50 items, indexOf() is faster for all items. Searching an array of 100,000 items, indexOf() is faster up to about 100, then the binary search dominates.

To find the 50,000th item out of 100,000 items, binary search takes 0.0078ms while indexOf() takes 3.382ms.

Here's the test code. I've never performance tested AS3 before, so watching elapsed time on a quiescent machine is the best I've got. (sprintf is the implementation posted on SO. It is just used to generate strings.)

    private static var myArray:Array;

    public static function setup():void {
        myArray = new Array();
        for (var i:int=0; i < 50; ++i) {
            myArray[i] = sprintf("s%06d", i);
        }
    }

    public static function timingTest():void {
        if (myArray == null) {
            setup();
        }

        var start:Number = getTimer();
        for (var j:int=0; j < 5000; ++j) {
            if (binarySearch(myArray, "s000049") != 49) {
                trace("oops!");
            }
        }
        trace("avg msecs per binarySearch " + (getTimer() - start)/j);

        start = getTimer();
        for (var k:int=0; k < 5000; ++k) {
            if (myArray.indexOf("s000049") != 49) {
                trace("oops!");
            }
        }
        trace("avg msecs per indexOf " + (getTimer() - start)/k);
    }

    public static function binarySearch(keys:Array, target:String):int {
        var high:int = keys.length;
        var low:int = -1;
        while (high - low > 1) {
            var probe:int = (low + high) / 2;
            if (keys[probe] > target)
                high = probe;
            else
                low = probe;
        }
        if (low == -1 || keys[low] !== target)
            return -1;
        else
            return low;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1. While I agree with preferring built-in algorithms in general, in this case the resulting SWF using indexOf() will not necessarily be faster. Consider: AS3 Array's indexOf() won't perform a binary search since the array isn't guaranteed to be sorted. If one has an array where the values are stored in sorted order, then binary search performs much faster than linear search as the number of elements increases. Algorithms 101. –  Chris W. Rea Dec 31 '09 at 21:48
    
I'm assuming that for very large arrays, a binary search would be faster than any built-in as3 array methods...though I could be wrong. Want to do a performance test myself, hence the need to convert the above code. –  eco_bach Dec 31 '09 at 21:50
    
Don't forget to include the cost of maintaining a sorted array. Sort + binary search will lose over even a naive native linear search. Algorithms 102. ;) –  Ken Fox Dec 31 '09 at 22:00
    
That's a good point. Please edit your answer so I can remove my downvote (too old to change without an edit). :-) –  Chris W. Rea Dec 31 '09 at 22:02
    
Actually, binary search is faster than a linear search even on pretty small arrays. Usually the cutoff point is somewhere around 20-30 elements at most. –  jk. Dec 31 '09 at 22:13

Here's a functional AS3 version:

    public static function find(keys:Array, target:String):int {
        var high:int = keys.length;
        var low:int = -1;
        while (high - low > 1) {
            var probe:int = (low + high) / 2;
            if (keys[probe] > target)
                high = probe;
            else
                low = probe;
        }

        if (low == -1 || keys[low] !== target)
            return -1;
        else
            return low;
    }

BTW, I would recommend you rename the function to be more meaningful, like binarySearch(), which indicates to the caller the array had better be sorted. A name like find() does not imply such.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The only improvement I would suggest is to use bitwise operations for the by 2 division. Supposed to be 2 to 3.5 X as fast. var probe:int = (low + high) / 2; would become var probe:int = (low + high) >> 1; osflash.org/as3_speed_optimizations –  eco_bach Jan 1 '10 at 2:16
    
Sure, if you want - but I think "divide by two" reads better. If you really want to get nuts about performance, you could even build a hybrid method that would do a linear search when keys.length is smaller than some threshold. Anyway, I wouldn't optimize prematurely; measure with a profiler and target the hot-spots, otherwise you'll end up with a morass of unreadable "clever" performance optimizations. –  Chris W. Rea Jan 2 '10 at 3:22
    
Would it not be an advantage to check to see if probe is equal to target and then return probe right away? Take for example an array of 0-99, a search for 24 would return in 2 (probes: 49, 24) instead of 6 (probes: 49, 24, 36, 30, 27, 25). Or is this an overall performance aspect? –  Joony Feb 22 '11 at 19:25

I cannot help you with Actionscript, but compareTo is indeed a standard Java method. It will compare the object it is invoked on against its argument and return a negative value if the object is less than the argument, positive if it is greater, and 0 if it is equal. The >>> operator is a right-shift operator; you can replace >>> 1 with / 2 (division by 2). Using the shift operator is just needless obfuscation these days when compilers are smart enough to replace division by a constant with a shift if that is better. (Aside: read this if your arrays have more than 230 elements...)

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'Using the shift operator is just needless obfuscation '. Apparently not so in actionscript 3, replacing division by 2 with an equivalent bit wise operation (>>1) can increase speed from 200-%400 percent. –  eco_bach Jan 1 '10 at 18:22
    
@eco_bach: Interesting. I was really referring just to Java, since I don't know Actionscript. And to be honest, sounds like the AS implementation is pretty bad if it can't do even a simple thing like that on its own; in compiled-language world, such things haven't been (or shouldn't have been) a concern for decades. –  jk. Jan 1 '10 at 19:25

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