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When I recompiled an old Obj-C project (a Cocoa app), the linker couldn't find some common library modules, including sin() and sysctl(). This project had been working in the previous version of Xcode. I am now using Xcode 3.1.2 in OSX 10.5. The error message was:

Line Location Tool:0: collect2: ld returned 1 exit status  
Line Location Tool:0: symbol(s) not found  
Line Location Tool:0: _AmIBeingDebugged in MeterMileage.o  
Line Location Tool:0: "_sysctl", referenced from:  
Line Location Tool:0: -[AnimatedStar drawRect:] in AnimatedStar.o  
Line Location Tool:0: "_sin", referenced from:  
...  

My current version of Xcode will link with the correct library for a new project using sin(), etc. How do I fix the project which started in an earlier Xcode to use the correct library? I saw the post about linking in FFTW, but sin() is not so unusual, is it?

I suppose I could create a new project, and copy my code, etc into it, but that seems a little clumsy. Is there a better way? There will probably be more projects that need updating.

Thanks, Gary

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Did you clean the target and build results directory? –  Azeem.Butt Dec 31 '09 at 23:55
    
Yes - did "Clean all targets", deleted "Build" folder –  gary Jan 1 '10 at 0:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's likely that the older project is trying to explicitly link against an older copy of the C standard library or runtime that doesn't exist on 10.5. Please post the linker invocation line, not just the error results; that should give us some clues.

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Well, I had to do a little learning... The closest I could find to a linker invocation line was the BUILD TRANSCRIPT line for GCC. It had a "-nostdlib" flag. Ah-hah! That was the problem. Is there a way to see the actual linker invocation? That might simplify things in the future by showing only the relevant ld flags (dropping the gcc stuff). Thank you for the help. –  gary Jan 1 '10 at 15:10

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