Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class level int defined in my header file. In the .m file, I have a method that I'd like to take an int parameter, modify it and have the modified value reflected at the caller. For example:

classLevelInt = 2;
[self someMethod:classLevelInt];

//Here, I'd like classLevelInt to equal the value assigned to it in the method

In -someMethod:

- (void)someMethod:(int)anInt{
//do some stuff
if(somecondition){
  anInt = 2 + 3; //some operation
}
}

I've tried using an

  • NSNumber
  • Pointer of a pointer (**)
  • Converting int to NSNumber inside the method, which results in a new address space

but never see the value set inside the method for classLevelInt reflected outside of that method. Without returning the new int value from -someMethod, how can I have the value of classLevelInt preserve outside of the method? Or, if that is simply not a good approach, what is a better way?

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can pass a pointer to classLevelInt as int*.

classLevelInt = 2;
[self someMethod:&classLevelInt];

- (void)someMethod:(int*)anInt {
  //do some stuff
  if(somecondition){
    *anInt = 2 + 3; //some operation
  }
}

A second way, you can directly change classLevelInt in the same class.

- (void)someMethod {
  //do some stuff
  if(somecondition){
    classLevelInt = 2 + 3; //some operation
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Was just going to answer the same thing. great answer! – Jacob Relkin Jan 1 '10 at 0:54
    
Requires pointer dereference. How do you use syntax such as (int&)anInt? – jjxtra Oct 7 '12 at 20:05

iamamac is correct, but you also asked if there is a better way.

If at all possible, just return the value directly. Pass-by-reference is generally causes a bit of a "code smell" of the unpleasant kind.

If you need to return multiple ints, maybe you really should create a structure or a class to encapsulate the data.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.