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I'd like to make some class inherits from some settings defined in the parent class inside a list, and i have no idea on how to make it in a clean way.
Let me take an example : Imagine we have lottery players, and they have preferred numbers, like NorthFolks loves 3, 5, 7, where SouthFolks prefer 12, 17 and 21.
Now i want to to make a SuperstisiousNorthFolk, which is like a NorthFolk, but likes 13 and 31 also.
So obviously, i could just define 3, 5, 7, 13, 31 as its preferred figures, but how could i have those settings inherited ?
Best solution would allow to chain inheritance, to define, say, a SatanistSupersitiousNorthFolk, inheriting SuperstitiousNorthFolk, that would like 666 also.

About the question : what did i try : Only things that either didn't compile, or didn't work, or were quite ugly.

EDIT : i'm not the one using the classes, and i'd like to have them working quite in a transparent way for their users, and look quite the same way, with a pref property, which would be public or private, i'm not clear yet about this.

Something like (!i know that this won't work!)

Class NorthFolks {
  List<int> prefs = [3, 5, 7 ];
}

and

Class SuperstitousNorthFolks {
   List<int> prefs = [13, 31] ;
}

and

Class SatanistSuperstitousNorthFolks {
   List<int> prefs = [666] ;
}

So maybe i could use a setter that would mean, in fact, 'add those elements', and a getter that would give them all, included all inherited... As i told, not yet clear about the solution (otherwise i guess i won't ask on SO !! :-) )

EDIT 2 : i think it's not possible, but in case anyone sees that not : i could like that it works in a mixin way, like i could extend SouthPeople with superstitious and with Satanist to get a class having 12, 17, 21, 13, 31 and 666 as prefered figures.

Rq : I'd like to avoid using mirrors if possible, since as of now they are not js-compatible.

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Something like this?

class BaseFolk {
    List<int> _prefs;
    BaseFolk(List<int> chainPrefs) {
        this._prefs = [];
        this._prefs.addAll(chainPrefs);
    }
    void printPrefs() {
        print(this._prefs.toString());
    }
}

class NorthFolk extends BaseFolk {
    NorthFolk([List<int> chainPrefs]) : super([3,5,7]..addAll(chainPrefs!=null ? chainPrefs : []));
}

class SouthFolk extends BaseFolk {
    SouthFolk([List<int> chainPrefs]) : super([12,17,21]..addAll(chainPrefs!=null ? chainPrefs : []));
}

class SuperstisiousNorthFolk extends NorthFolk {
    SuperstisiousNorthFolk([List<int> chainPrefs]) : super([13,31]..addAll(chainPrefs!=null ? chainPrefs : []));
}

class SatanistSupersitiousNorthFolk extends SuperstisiousNorthFolk {
    SatanistSupersitiousNorthFolk([List<int> chainPrefs]) : super([666]..addAll(chainPrefs!=null ? chainPrefs : []));
}

void main() {
    new SuperstisiousNorthFolk().printPrefs();
    new SouthFolk().printPrefs();
    new NorthFolk().printPrefs();
    new SatanistSupersitiousNorthFolk().printPrefs();
}

EDIT According to comments

class BaseFolk {
    List<int> _prefs = [];
    get prefs => this._prefs;
    void addPref(int pref) {
        this._prefs.add(pref);
    }
    void addPrefs(List<int> prefs) {
        this._prefs.addAll(prefs);
    }
}

class NorthFolk extends BaseFolk {
    NorthFolk() {
        this.addPrefs([3,5,7]);
    }
}

class SuperstisiousNorthFolk extends NorthFolk {
    SuperstisiousNorthFolk() {
        this.addPrefs([13,31]);
    }
}

void main() {
    print(new SuperstisiousNorthFolk().prefs);
    print(new NorthFolk().prefs);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, it is getting near from what i want. I edited to be more precise about my intents, if you can throw an eye. – GameAlchemist Nov 9 '13 at 19:12
    
@GameAlchemist I don't think it's possible like you want. To avoid reflection, "prefs" has to be defined in a base class. Sure, you can write a custom setter there, but the "initialization" has to happen in the constructor or some other method. And with this restriction, you could just create a method "addPrefs()" to add them instead. But - why does it have to be a property in the subclass anyway? – MarioP Nov 9 '13 at 20:16
    
I want it to be a property of the subclass for clarity : each new class will just define which figures it likes also, which seems very convenient for the user. But i wonder if i won't get to a solution with a strange getter/setter pair (setter adds, while getter provides the full list) + something like what you do in the constructor. – GameAlchemist Nov 9 '13 at 20:20
    
@GameAlchemist Well, like I said, "prefs" has to be a property of the base class, so I don't think there will be a solution for this. That being said, "call some method to add figures" can't be that hard to understand for your class users. In fact, I would be more confused doing it your way if you could somehow get it to work, to be honest. – MarioP Nov 9 '13 at 20:32
    
@GameAlchemist Double comment - shame on me. Added an example of what i mean with "calling some method". – MarioP Nov 9 '13 at 20:38

If you can use Iterables rather than lists, this is very easy to do by chaining the subclasses list with the superclasses list.

I'll demonstrate with Quiver's concat() function

import 'package:quiver/iterables.dart' show concat;

Class NorthFolks {
  Iterable<int> get prefs => [3, 5, 7];
}

Class SuperstitousNorthFolks extends NorthFolks {
   Iterable<int> get prefs => concat([super.prefs, [13, 31]]);
}

Class SatanistSuperstitousNorthFolks extends SuperstitousNorthFolks {
   Iterable<int> get prefs = concat([super.prefs, [666]]);
}

main() {
  var folk = new SatanistSuperstitousNorthFolks();
  print(folk.prefs); // [3, 5, 7, 13, 31, 666];
}

If you need lists you have to worry about what to do on attempted mutations, so it's probably much harder to even define the desired behavior. Note that concat() returns a lazily evaluated Iterable, so you can mutate the underlying collections and have the new values reflected in the output.

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