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When I print a numpy array, I get a truncated representation, but I want the full array.

Is there any way to do this?

Examples:

>>> numpy.arange(10000)
array([   0,    1,    2, ..., 9997, 9998, 9999])
>>> numpy.arange(10000).reshape(250,40)
array([[   0,    1,    2, ...,   37,   38,   39],
       [  40,   41,   42, ...,   77,   78,   79],
       [  80,   81,   82, ...,  117,  118,  119],
       ..., 
       [9880, 9881, 9882, ..., 9917, 9918, 9919],
       [9920, 9921, 9922, ..., 9957, 9958, 9959],
       [9960, 9961, 9962, ..., 9997, 9998, 9999]])
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3  
Are you using numpy, specifically? –  Alex Martelli Jan 1 '10 at 1:54
1  
It looks like he is.. –  Reed Copsey Jan 1 '10 at 2:02
2  
Is there a way to do it on a "one off" basis? That is, to print out the full output once, but not at other times in the script? –  Matt O'Brien May 18 '14 at 3:07
1  
@Matt O'Brien see ZSG's answer below –  louism Aug 8 '14 at 21:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 93 down vote accepted

To clarify on Reed's reply

import numpy
numpy.set_printoptions(threshold=numpy.nan)

Note that the reply as given above works with an initial 'from numpy import *', which is not advisable. This also works for me

numpy.set_printoptions(threshold='nan')

For full documentation, see http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.set_printoptions.html.

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This sounds like you're using numpy.

If that's the case, you can add:

set_printoptions(threshold=nan)

That will disable the corner printing. For more information, see this NumPy Tutorial.

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Note that I believe you need either threshold='nan' (that is, quotes around the nan), or you have to import the constant: from numpy import nan –  charleslparker Jun 7 at 20:44

Here is a one-off way to do this, which is useful if you don't want to change your default settings:

def fullprint(*args, **kwargs):
  from pprint import pprint
  import numpy
  opt = numpy.get_printoptions()
  numpy.set_printoptions(threshold='nan')
  pprint(*args, **kwargs)
  numpy.set_printoptions(**opt)
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2  
Looks like this would be a good place to use a context manager, so you can say "with fullprint". –  Paul Price Sep 17 '14 at 15:38
import numpy as np
np.set_printoptions(threshold=np.inf)

I suggest using np.inf instead of np.nan which is suggested by others. They both work for your purpose, but by setting the threshold to "infinity" it is obvious to everybody reading your code what you mean. Having a threshold of "not a number" seems a little vague to me.

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The previous answers are the correct ones, but as a weeker alternative you can transform into a list:

>>> numpy.arange(100).reshape(25,4).tolist()

[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10, 11], [12, 13, 14, 15], [16, 17, 18, 19], [20, 21,
22, 23], [24, 25, 26, 27], [28, 29, 30, 31], [32, 33, 34, 35], [36, 37, 38, 39], [40, 41,
42, 43], [44, 45, 46, 47], [48, 49, 50, 51], [52, 53, 54, 55], [56, 57, 58, 59], [60, 61,
62, 63], [64, 65, 66, 67], [68, 69, 70, 71], [72, 73, 74, 75], [76, 77, 78, 79], [80, 81,
82, 83], [84, 85, 86, 87], [88, 89, 90, 91], [92, 93, 94, 95], [96, 97, 98, 99]]
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