Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a derivative question related to the answer given in Set line colors according to colormap where a great solution was suggested to plot several lines with colors according to a colorbar (see code and output image below).

I have a list that stores a string associated with each plotted line, like so:

legend_list = ['line_1', 'line_2', 'line_3', 'line_4']

and I'd like to add these strings as legends in a box (where the first string corresponds to the first plotted line and so on) in the upper right corner of the plot. How could I do this?

I'd be open to not use LineCollection if it was necessary, but I need to keep the colorbar and the colors of each line associated to it.


Code and output

import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.collections import LineCollection

# The line format you curently have:
lines = [[(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (8, 7, 6, 5, 4)],
         [(4, 5, 6, 7, 8), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)]]

# Reformat it to what `LineCollection` expects:
lines = [zip(x, y) for x, y in lines]

z = np.array([0.1, 9.4, 3.8, 2.0])

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
lines = LineCollection(lines, array=z, cmap=plt.cm.rainbow, linewidths=5)
ax.add_collection(lines)
fig.colorbar(lines)

# Manually adding artists doesn't rescale the plot, so we need to autoscale
ax.autoscale()

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure it's possible to add legends to LineCollection because a LineCollection is not iterable. I'm not sure though. –  void Nov 9 '13 at 16:40
    
Please see updated answer, I'd be open to drop LineCollection but I need to keep the colorbar. –  Gabriel Nov 9 '13 at 17:07
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

@ubuntu's answer is right approach if you have a small number of lines. (And if you're wanting to add a legend, you presumably do!)

Just to show the other option, though, you can still use a LineCollection, you just need to use "proxy artists" for the legend:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.collections import LineCollection
from matplotlib.lines import Line2D

# The line format you curently have:
lines = [[(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (8, 7, 6, 5, 4)],
         [(4, 5, 6, 7, 8), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)]]

# Reformat it to what `LineCollection` expects:
lines = [zip(x, y) for x, y in lines]

z = np.array([0.1, 9.4, 3.8, 2.0])

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
lines = LineCollection(lines, array=z, cmap=plt.cm.rainbow, linewidths=5)
ax.add_collection(lines)
fig.colorbar(lines)

# Manually adding artists doesn't rescale the plot, so we need to autoscale
ax.autoscale()

def make_proxy(zvalue, scalar_mappable, **kwargs):
    color = scalar_mappable.cmap(scalar_mappable.norm(zvalue))
    return Line2D([0, 1], [0, 1], color=color, **kwargs)
proxies = [make_proxy(item, lines, linewidth=5) for item in z]
ax.legend(proxies, ['Line 1', 'Line 2', 'Line 3', 'Line 4'])

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for showing how to use proxy artists. Perhaps change make_proxy(item, ...) to make_proxy(item/z.max(),...) so the legend colors match the LineCollection colors? –  unutbu Nov 9 '13 at 20:24
    
@unutbu - Woops! Thanks for the catch! –  Joe Kington Nov 9 '13 at 21:23
1  
scalar_mappable.cmap(scalar_mappable.norm(zvalue)): cool! –  unutbu Nov 9 '13 at 21:27
    
Great answer Joe, thank you very much! –  Gabriel Nov 10 '13 at 13:53
add comment

Using a LineCollection is faster than using plt.plot if you have a large number of lines, but I haven't been able to figure out how to add a legend if using LineCollection. The legend guide says to use a proxy artist, but if you have to create a different proxy artist for each line segment in the LineCollection, it might be better to bite the bullet and just use plt.plot.

And since you want a legend, it seems plausible that you have a small number of lines. Indeed, that would be fortunate, since trying to plot thousands of lines with plt.plot is a recipe for slowness.

So, if you have a small number of lines, the following should work fine:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.cm as cm

lines = [[(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)],
         [(0, 1, 2, 3, 4), (8, 7, 6, 5, 4)],
         [(4, 5, 6, 7, 8), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4)]]

z = np.array([0.1, 9.4, 3.8, 2.0])

legend_list = ['line_1', 'line_2', 'line_3', 'line_4']

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
cmap = plt.get_cmap('rainbow')

def normalize(z):
    z = z.copy()
    z -= z.min()
    z /= z.max()
    return z

for (x, y), color, label in zip(lines, normalize(z), legend_list):
    plt.plot(x, y, label=label, color=cmap(color), lw=5)

m = cm.ScalarMappable(cmap=cmap)
m.set_array(z)
plt.colorbar(m)

ax.legend()
plt.savefig('/tmp/test.png')

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This is a fantastic answer @unubtu. Joe's answer seems more fitted since the original question was about adding legends to a LineCollection, so I'll mark that one as accepted. Thank you very much! –  Gabriel Nov 10 '13 at 13:19
    
Is it possible that this is only working because the min value for z is close to zero? I tried it with my real data and I had to do a linear transformation instead of just using color/z.max(). Here's the code I used to get the colors right: m, h = 1./(ages.max()-ages.min()), ages.min()/(ages.min()-ages.max()) (new line) col_transf = m*color+h. It does a simple linear transformation between 0 and 1. –  Gabriel Nov 10 '13 at 15:03
2  
It depends on what you want. If you want purple to be associated with z-value 0, then color/z.max() works. But if you want purple to always be associated with the line with the lowest z-value, then indeed you need to rescale as you have done. I'll modify my answer to show another way to do it. –  unutbu Nov 10 '13 at 15:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.