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Suppose I have a list contains un-equal length lists.

a = [ [ 1, 2, 3], [2], [2, 4] ]

What is the best way to obtain a zero padding numpy array with standard shape?

zero_a = [ [1, 2, 3], [2, 0, 0], [2, 4, 0] ]

I know I can use list operation like

n = max( map( len, a ) )
map( lambda x : x.extend( [0] * (n-len(x)) ), a )
zero_a = np.array(zero_a)

but I was wondering is there any easy numpy way to do this work?

share|improve this question
    
Have you made any attempts – megawac Nov 9 '13 at 16:29
1  
@megawac I update my question. I am trying to find alternative numpy method. – Xingzhong Nov 9 '13 at 16:38
    
+1 to the question because I've wanted something like this before myself, and couldn't think of anything clean enough. (I sometimes use pd.DataFrame(a).fillna(0).values, but I've been on a pandas kick for a while. There should really be something numpy-native.) – DSM Nov 9 '13 at 17:01
    
there is a pad function in numpy 1.7 – alko Nov 9 '13 at 17:08
3  
@alko: true, but the first thing it does is call narray = np.array(array) on the argument, which if it's a list of lists with varying lengths will give us an array with dtype=object and lists as elements. It's good for padding existing ndarrays, but I can't see how to get it to help here. – DSM Nov 9 '13 at 17:15
up vote 4 down vote accepted

As numpy have to know size of an array just prior to its initialization, best solution would be a numpy based constructor for such case. Sadly, as far as I know, there is none.

Probably not ideal, but slightly faster solution will be create numpy array with zeros and fill with list values.

import numpy as np
def pad_list(lst):
    inner_max_len = max(map(len, lst))
    map(lambda x: x.extend([0]*(inner_max_len-len(x))), lst)
    return np.array(lst)

def apply_to_zeros(lst, dtype=np.int64):
    inner_max_len = max(map(len, lst))
    result = np.zeros([len(lst), inner_max_len], dtype)
    for i, row in enumerate(lst):
        for j, val in enumerate(row):
            result[i][j] = val
    return result

Test case:

>>> pad_list([[ 1, 2, 3], [2], [2, 4]])
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [2, 0, 0],
       [2, 4, 0]])

>>> apply_to_zeros([[ 1, 2, 3], [2], [2, 4]])
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [2, 0, 0],
       [2, 4, 0]])

Performance:

>>> timeit.timeit('from __main__ import pad_list as f; f([[ 1, 2, 3], [2], [2, 4]])', number = 10000)
0.3937079906463623
>>> timeit.timeit('from __main__ import apply_to_zeros as f; f([[ 1, 2, 3], [2], [2, 4]])', number = 10000)
0.1344289779663086
share|improve this answer

Not strictly a function from numpy, but you could do something like this

from itertools import izip, izip_longest
import numpy
a=[[1,2,3], [4], [5,6]]
res1 = numpy.array(list(izip(*izip_longest(*a, fillvalue=0))))

or, alternatively:

res2=numpy.array(list(izip_longest(*a, fillvalue=0))).transpose()

If you use python 3, use zip, and itertools.zip_longest.

share|improve this answer
    
nice solution, but ties with manual padding on my machine (as expected -- key downside is generation of new list) – alko Nov 9 '13 at 18:21

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