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Given a two dimensional matrix, e.g.

l = [[1,1,1],
     [2,5,2],
     [3,3,3]])

what is the most efficient way of implementing a shift operation on columns and rows?

E.g.

shift('up', l) 

[[2, 5, 2],
 [3, 3, 3],
 [1, 1, 1]]

but

shift('left', l) 

[[1, 1, 1],
 [5, 2, 2],
 [3, 3, 3]]

I'm using collections.deque on both depths because of this answer but while a 'up' or 'down' only requires 1 shift, a 'left' or 'right' requires N shifts (my implementation is using a for cycle for each row).

In C I think this can be improved using pointer arithmetic (see e.g. this answer).

Is there a better pythonic way?

EDIT:

  • By efficient I mean if there is a way of avoiding the N shifts.
  • We can assume the matrix is squared.
  • The shift can be in place.

Thanks to martineau for pointing out these important points of the question. I'm sorry I didn't pointed them out before.

share|improve this question
    
Efficient in what sense...cycles, memory? –  martineau Nov 9 '13 at 18:15
    
Will the shift amount ever be more than the respective matrix dimension and if so what should happen? –  martineau Nov 9 '13 at 18:17
    
@martineau Efficient in the sense described in the question: it currently requires N shifts, and 1 shift would be the ideal; the shift amount I'm considering is 1, but feel free to generalize; Shift is the identity transformation when is of the size of the matrix. –  J. C. Leitão Nov 9 '13 at 20:37
    
If you had described the type of efficiency in your question, I wouldn't have need to ask for clarification. Here's a few more: Can the matrix be assumed to be square? Does the function shift the matrix in-place or return a new one? –  martineau Nov 10 '13 at 18:51
    
@martineau, you are right, I'm sorry. I edited the question to make it more clear. –  J. C. Leitão Nov 10 '13 at 19:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one fairly efficient way to do it that will work with non-square matrices:

UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT = 'up', 'down', 'left', 'right'

def shift(direction, number, matrix):
    ''' shift given 2D matrix in-place the given number of rows or columns
        in the specified (UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT) direction and return it
    '''
    if direction in (UP, DOWN):
        n =  (number % len(matrix) if direction == UP else
            -(number % len(matrix)))
        h = matrix[:n]
        del matrix[:n]
        matrix.extend(h)
        return matrix
    elif direction in (LEFT, RIGHT):
        n =  (number % len(matrix[0]) if direction == LEFT else
            -(number % len(matrix[0])))
        temp = zip(*matrix)
        h = temp[:n]
        del temp[:n]
        temp.extend(h)
        matrix[:] = map(list, zip(*temp))
        return matrix
    else:
        return matrix

if __name__ == '__main__':
    def print_shifted_matrix(direction, number, matrix):
        print(direction + ': ' + (10-2-len(direction))*' ' +
              ('\n' + 10*' ').join(str(row)
                                  for row in shift(direction, number, matrix)))
        print

    matrix1 = [[1, 2, 3, 4],
               [5, 6, 7, 8],
               [9, 10, 11, 12]]

    matrix2 = [[1, 2, 3],
               [4, 5, 6],
               [7, 8, 9],
               [10, 11, 12]]

    for matrix in matrix1, matrix2:
        print_shifted_matrix('original', 0, matrix)
        print_shifted_matrix(UP, 1, matrix)
        print_shifted_matrix(DOWN, 1, matrix)
        print_shifted_matrix(LEFT, 1, matrix)
        print_shifted_matrix(RIGHT, 1, matrix)

Output (note the results are cumulative since the operations are performed in-place):

original: [1, 2, 3, 4]
          [5, 6, 7, 8]
          [9, 10, 11, 12]

up:       [5, 6, 7, 8]
          [9, 10, 11, 12]
          [1, 2, 3, 4]

down:     [1, 2, 3, 4]
          [5, 6, 7, 8]
          [9, 10, 11, 12]

left:     [2, 3, 4, 1]
          [6, 7, 8, 5]
          [10, 11, 12, 9]

right:    [1, 2, 3, 4]
          [5, 6, 7, 8]
          [9, 10, 11, 12]

original: [1, 2, 3]
          [4, 5, 6]
          [7, 8, 9]
          [10, 11, 12]

up:       [4, 5, 6]
          [7, 8, 9]
          [10, 11, 12]
          [1, 2, 3]

down:     [1, 2, 3]
          [4, 5, 6]
          [7, 8, 9]
          [10, 11, 12]

left:     [2, 3, 1]
          [5, 6, 4]
          [8, 9, 7]
          [11, 12, 10]

right:    [1, 2, 3]
          [4, 5, 6]
          [7, 8, 9]
          [10, 11, 12]
share|improve this answer

This is a generic version you can rotate it in all four directions, any number of times

l = [[1,1,1],
     [2,5,2],
     [3,3,3]]

def shift(direction, count, myList):
    myLen = len(myList)
    if direction == "up":
        return [myList[i % myLen] for i in range(count, count + myLen)]
    elif direction == "down":
        return [myList[-i] for i in range(count, count - myLen, -1)]
    elif direction == "left":
        tlist = zip(*myList)
        return map(list, zip(*[tlist[i % myLen] for i in range(count, count + myLen)]))
    elif direction == "right":
        tlist = zip(*myList)
        return map(list, zip(*[tlist[-i] for i in range(count, count - myLen, -1)]))

print shift("up", 1, l)
print shift("up", 2, l)
print shift("down", 2, l)
print shift("down", 1, l)
print shift("left", 1, l)
print shift("right", 1, l)

Output

[[2, 5, 2], [3, 3, 3], [1, 1, 1]]
[[3, 3, 3], [1, 1, 1], [2, 5, 2]]
[[2, 5, 2], [3, 3, 3], [1, 1, 1]]
[[3, 3, 3], [1, 1, 1], [2, 5, 2]]
[[1, 1, 1], [5, 2, 2], [3, 3, 3]]
[[1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 5], [3, 3, 3]]
share|improve this answer
    
Admittedly the question is vague on a number of important points, but your code only works for square matrices -- so it may not be "generic" enough. –  martineau Nov 10 '13 at 18:45

Maybe something like this using numpy:

def shift(x, direction='up'):
    if direction == 'up':
        temp = range(x.shape[0])
        indicies = temp[1:] + [temp[0]]
        return x[indicies]
    elif direction == 'left':
        temp = range(x.shape[1])
        indicies = temp[1:] + [temp[0]]
        return x[:, indicies]
    else:
        print 'Error direction not known'

Result:

>>> shift(l, direction='up')
array([[2, 5, 2],
       [3, 3, 3],
       [1, 1, 1]])
>>> shift(l, direction='left')
array([[1, 1, 1],
       [5, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3]])
>>> shift(l, direction='to the moon')
Error direction not known
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