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I have a data.table like this:

dt<-data.table(v1=rep(c('a','b','c'),4), v2=rep(c(1,2),6))
    v1 v2
 1:  a  1
 2:  b  2
 3:  c  1
 4:  a  2
 5:  b  1
 6:  c  2
 7:  a  1
 8:  b  2
 9:  c  1
10:  a  2
11:  b  1
12:  c  2

I need to remove all rows that have the same v1 but different v2 (except the first row in each combination of v1 and v2). In this example, rows 4-6 and 10-12 should be removed. How can I do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This works I think:

dt[, v2[v2 == v2[1]], by = v1]
#   v1 V1
#1:  a  1
#2:  a  1
#3:  b  2
#4:  b  2
#5:  c  1
#6:  c  1
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1  
Thanks! This seem to be quite close to what I need, except that it doesn't take rows, only values of v2. This fixes it: dt[, .SD[v2 == v2[1],], by = v1] –  Andrey Chetverikov Nov 9 '13 at 22:15
    
The .SD way allows the OP to preserve the original ordering, in case that matters. Of course, it's possible to make a row-number column to store the original order and then use Arun's solution. –  Frank Nov 10 '13 at 4:02
    
@Arun Ah ok. I guess I read Andrey's comment about wanting the whole row as implying that he has other columns v3, v4, ... I guess that would not matter, though (since you could setkey on the two relevant columns and the others would still be in the same order...I think). Anyway, sorry for forcing a benchmark+identical check. :) –  Frank Nov 10 '13 at 8:06
    
@Arun, your variant is indeed much faster. But, as noted by Frank, if you have more than two columns, the resulting a1, a2, and a3 dt are not identical. Only a2 keeps the rows the same as they were in the original dt. –  Andrey Chetverikov Nov 10 '13 at 8:15
    
@Arun Here are the results from your script with 3 variables: pastebin.com/Rcyn2GpP –  Andrey Chetverikov Nov 10 '13 at 8:22

How about this?

tmp = dt[dt[, list(I=.I[1]), by=list(v1)]$I]
setkey(dt)[tmp]
   v1 v2
1:  a  1
2:  a  1
3:  b  2
4:  b  2
5:  c  1
6:  c  1

Bigger data and benchmarking:

# create some data
require(data.table)
require(microbenchmark)
set.seed(1)
ff <- function() paste0(sample(letters, sample(5:8, 1), TRUE), collapse="")
ll <- unique(replicate(1e4, ff()))
DT <- data.table(v1=sample(ll, 1e6, TRUE), v2=sample(1:1e4, 1e6, TRUE))

# add functions
eddi <- function(dt=copy(DT)) {
    dt[, list(v2=v2[v2 == v2[1]]), by = v1]
}

andrey <- function(dt=copy(DT)) {
    dt[, .SD[v2 == v2[1],], by = v1]
}

arun <- function(dt=copy(DT)) {
    tmp = dt[dt[, list(I=.I[1]), by=list(v1)]$I]
    setkey(dt)[tmp]
}

# benchmark    
microbenchmark(a1 <- eddi(), a2 <- andrey(), a3 <- arun(), times=2)
Unit: milliseconds
           expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
   a1 <- eddi()  342.4429  342.4429  348.1604  353.8780  353.8780     2
 a2 <- andrey() 5810.8947 5810.8947 5829.0742 5847.2537 5847.2537     2
   a3 <- arun()  494.6861  494.6861  509.3022  523.9182  523.9182     2

setkey(a3, NULL)
> identical(a1, a2) # [1] TRUE
> identical(a1, a3) # [1] TRUE
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I guess this works:

myrows <- dt[,list(v2=v2[1]),by=v1]
merge(dt,myrows,by=c('v1','v2'))

which gives

   v1 v2
1:  a  1
2:  a  1
3:  b  2
4:  b  2
5:  c  1
6:  c  1

This second solution is more convoluted and will only work if you don't have other columns you want to keep:

dt[,.SD[,list(.N,.GRP),by=v2][.GRP==1,list(v2=rep(v2,N))],by=v1]

It demonstrates special symbols .SD,.GRP and .N, though, which are quite useful. They're documented at help("[.data.table")

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You could try using the mult argument. I'm not sure if the setkeyv will affect the rows that you are selecting though, please check that before you use it -

setkeyv(dt,c('v1'))
firstocc <- dt[unique(dt),,mult="first"][,v2.1 := NULL]

setkeyv(dt,c('v1','v2'))
setkeyv(firstocc,c('v1','v2'))
dt[firstocc]
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1  
Try doing dt[,rn:=1:.N] first to see which row numbers are retained. It doesn't look like the OP's requested output, I think. For example, row 7, which duplicates 1, is actually supposed to be kept. –  Frank Nov 9 '13 at 19:56
1  
Thanks @Frank, I think I misread the question. This should fix it. –  Codoremifa Nov 10 '13 at 3:09
    
Ok, yup that works. Have a +1 to even out that -1. –  Frank Nov 10 '13 at 3:59

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