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I just started studying about Pthreads, can someone explain to me why the Example 1 is dangerous while the Example 2 is safe? What does the (int*)malloc(sizeof(int)) provide?

Example 1

 int *globalptr = NULL;
 // shared ptr
void *foo1 ( void *ptr1 )
 {
    int i = 15;
    globalptr = &i; // ??? dangerous!
    ...
 }

 void *foo2 ( void *ptr2 )
 {
     if (globalptr) *globalptr = 17;
     ...
 }

Example 2

int *globalptr= NULL;
// shared ptr
 void *foo1 ( void *ptr1 )
 {
    int i = 15;
    globalptr =(int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
    // safe, but possibly memory leak;
    // OK if garbage collection ok
 }

 void *foo2 ( void *ptr2 )
 {
     if (globalptr) *globalptr = 17;
 ...
 }
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't see that this is particularly relevant to threading in general or pthreads in particular. It is a standard C error.

Example 1 is assigning the address of a local variable to a global ptr. The local variable will go out of scope and (possibly) be overwritten by a different value later as the stack is resused. At that point the global ptr is pointing to garbage or, minimally, something incorrect.

Example 2 allocates space on the healp (which won't disappear until it is freed) and assigns it to the global pointer. Some other function needs to remember to free the space that foo2 allocates and, if they don't, that is where the memory leak is. As a rule people try to have that which allocates memory be responsible for freeing it but that isn't 100% possible in practice.

Common pthreads error

int main()
{
   dataStruct a;

   for (i...n)
       a.somevalue = getData();
       pthread_create(tid[i], NULL, threadfunc, (void *) &a);
}

There is no guarantee when a thread is going to be scheduled to run or that it will copy the data it was passed into its own local variables. So by the time it uses the data ptr it was passed it could be pointing to something erroneous.

share|improve this answer
    
I just saw these examples in a pthread section of a book, before introducing the mutex mechanism. Very clear explanation, thank you. – Avraam Mavridis Nov 9 '13 at 18:48
    
@Avraam Mavridis I guess it is a common threading error in the sense that you will see dozens of questions here asking why their thread data is messed up...often because they pass the address of a stack variable in the thread they are in to a new thread rather than something on the heap. Consequently if the data gets overwritten on the local stack (or the thread disappears entirely along with its stack) the created thread's data ptr is pointing to who-knows-what. – Duck Nov 9 '13 at 18:54

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