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I got a very strange bug in my code and managed to reduce it to the following single function.

#include "either.hpp"

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>

int main()
{
    using std::string;
    using std::vector;

    auto callback = []()
    {
        auto either = data::either<string,vector<int>>(string("test"));
        return either;
        return data::either<string,vector<int>>(string("test"));
    };
    callback();
}

When run, this program generate a segmentation fault on std::string's destructor. But if we remove the second return statement, it work perfectly.

Now, the data::either class is using a union with two members, and the lambda's return statement will cause the destruction of the stack-allcated variable.

Is there a problem with my use of those features, is it undefined behaviour for a reason I don't know, or is it simply a compiler bug?

Here is the either class:

#ifndef EITHER_HPP
#define EITHER_HPP

#include <cassert>
#include <functional>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

// Model the haskel Data.Either data type.
// http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.6.0.1/docs/Data-Either.html

namespace data
{
    template<class Left, class Right>
    class either
    {
        static_assert(
            !std::is_same<
                typename std::remove_cv<Left>::type,
                typename std::remove_cv<Right>::type
            >::value,
            "data::either<A,B>: type A and B must be different.");

        bool m_is_right;
        union
        {
            Left m_left;
            Right m_right;
        };


    public:
        explicit either(Left l)
            : m_is_right(false)
            , m_left(std::move(l))
        {
        }

        explicit either(Right r)
            : m_is_right(true)
            , m_right(std::move(r))
        {
        }

        either(either const& other)
            : m_is_right(other.is_right())
        {
            if (other.is_left())
            {
                m_left = other.left();
            }
            else
            {
                m_right = other.right();
            }
        }

        either(either&& other)
            : m_is_right(other.is_right())
        {
            if (other.is_left())
            {
                m_left = std::move(other.left());
            }
            else
            {
                m_right = std::move(other.right());
            }
        }

        ~either()
        {
            if (is_right())
            {
                right().~Right();
            }
            else
            {
                left().~Left();
            }
        }

        either& operator=(either const& other)
        {
            m_is_right = other.is_right();

            if (other.is_left())
            {
                m_left = other.left();
            }
            else
            {
                m_right = other.right();
            }

            return *this;
        }

        either& operator=(either&& other)
        {
            m_is_right = other.is_right();

            if (other.is_left())
            {
                m_left = std::move(other.left());
            }
            else
            {
                m_right = std::move(other.right());
            }

            return *this;
        }

        bool is_left() const
        {
            return !is_right();
        }

        bool is_right() const
        {
            return m_is_right;
        }

        Left& left()
        {
            assert(is_left());
            return m_left;
        }

        Left const& left() const
        {
            assert(is_left());
            return m_left;
        }

        Right& right()
        {
            assert(is_right());
            return m_right;
        }

        Right const& right() const
        {
            assert(is_right());
            return m_right;
        }
    };
}

#endif

I tested it with the following compilers:

$ clang++ -std=c++11 test.cpp && ./a.out 
Segmentation fault
$ clang++ --version
Debian clang version 3.2-11 (tags/RELEASE_32/final) (based on LLVM 3.2)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix

$ g++ -std=c++11 test.cpp && ./a.out 
Segmentation fault
$ g++ --version
g++ (Debian 4.7.3-4) 4.7.3
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
share|improve this question
1  
@jxh: as of the 2011 revision of C++, unions can store types with constructors. However, it is necessary to take care of the proper initialization, destruction, and assignment manually. In C++03 you can only have PODs in a union. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 9 '13 at 20:40
    
@DietmarKühl I think [class.dtor]/5 even says the dtor of the union should be deleted, as the dtor of string (and vector) is not trivial. –  dyp Nov 9 '13 at 20:41
    
@DyP: agreed: the destructor is deleted by default if there is a non-trivial member stored in a union. Of course, you can provide a user-define destructor doing the right thing (e.g., nothing because the enclosing class does the appropriate destruction using a suitable descriptor and the union is private). –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 9 '13 at 20:46
    
@DietmarKühl: Thanks, I'll stick with placement new if I want such a union. C++ 11 is really like an entirely different language. –  jxh Nov 9 '13 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems in your copy constructor you assume that m_left or m_right are initialized in a way suitable to assign a std::vector<int> or a std::string. The member is, however, most likely not initialized at all to be suitable for the class: it is zero-initialized as far as I know. I haven't used C++11 unions enough but I think you need to use

new(&this->m_left) Left(other.m_left);

and likewise for m_right. In the move-constructor you, obviously, need to also insert std::move().

Note that your copy assignment is also likely to be severely flawed: it assumes that left hand side of the assignment has the same type as the right hand side. If the stored types differ, the assignment does not work! If the stored types differ, you need to destroy the left hand side's content and construct a copy of the right hand side into it. Off-hand, I'd think I would use the copy&swap approach leveraging the existing copy constructor and the destructor to create a strong exception safe assignment (if swapping the respective current element is non-throwing).

share|improve this answer
    
I think [class.base.init]/8 says that no initialization is performed for anonymous union data members. However, it seems as you can designate a member of the anonymous union in the mem-initializer-list of the surrounding class. –  dyp Nov 9 '13 at 20:59
    
Ok, I understand why it should fail and what I should do, but I still don't understand why the problem does not appear if there is only the first return statement. It looks like it should always fail... –  authchir Nov 9 '13 at 21:23

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