Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Working over at codewars I was trying to solve this problem:

In this kata we want to convert a string into an integer. The strings simply represent the numbers in words.

Examples:

  • "one" => 1
  • "twenty" => 20
  • "two hundred forty-six" => 246
  • "seven hundred eighty-three thousand nine hundred and nineteen" => 783919

==================================================================================

I came up with the code below to do this. On jsfiddle for you convience.

A problem I've run into is 'seven hundred thousand' gives you 10700.

I've spent a day looking around and trying to figure this out but am just flat stuck. The steps the program takes is:

  • string becomes 'thousand hundred seven' - good
  • first while loop finds 'thousand' and sets multiplier to 1000 - good
  • second while loop finds 'hundred' but then the mult.exec(a[0]) if statement resolves to null. - damn

So instead of the multiplier becoming 100000, the value becomes 100000, and we are doomed to get the wrong answer.

While trying to debug this I tried creating the a array being used during the second loop in the while in jsfiddle. There it worked and equated to 'hundred' instead of null. Anyone know why this would happen?

function parseInt(number) { 

    // reference array for english -> integer
    var ref = { one:1, two:2, three:3, four:4, five:5, six:6, seven:7, eight:8, nine:9, ten:10, eleven:11, twelve:12, thirteen:13, fourteen:14, fifteen:15, sixteen:16, seventeen:17, eighteen:18, nineteen:19, twenty:20, thirty: 30, forty: 40, fifty: 50, sixty: 60, seventy: 70, eighty: 80, ninety:90, hundred: 100, thousand: 1000, million: 1000000 };

    // regex to find number values from the string
    var find = new RegExp( "(one|t(wo|hree|en|welve|hirteen|wenty|hirty)|f(our|ive|ourteen|iftenn|orty|ifty)|s(ixteen|ixty|eventy|ix|even|eventeen|teen)|eigh(ty|t|teen)|nin(ety|e|eteen)|zero|hundred|thousand|million)", "gi" );

    // hundred/thousand/million etc. act as multipliers in this solution and need a seperate search
    var mult = new RegExp( "(hundred|thousand|million)", "gi" );

    // reversing the string allows us to add largest digits first
    number = number.split(' ').reverse().join(" ");

    // while there is a number in string number
    //   if that number is a multiplier
    //     if that number is 100 -> multiplier = multiplier * 100;
    //     else multiplier = reference value;
    //   else value = value + reference value * multiplier
    // end while
    value = 0; multiplier = 1;
    while( a = find.exec(number) ) {

        if( m = mult.exec(a[0]) ) {

            if( m[0] == 'hundred' ) { multiplier *= 100; }
            else { multiplier = ref[m[0]]; }

        }
        else {

            value += ref[a[0]] * multiplier;

        }

    }   
    return value;
}
share|improve this question
    
That's an interesting problem you're working on, and I can't say that I fully understand your code. There are a few gotchas in there, though, that aren't directly related to your problem. 1) you may want to avoid a name collision with the built-in 'parseInt' function. It may not be impacting your codes behavior but that's probably a bad practice to use a built-in name like that. –  Mike Edwards Nov 9 '13 at 20:58
    
2) your find regular expression doesn't properly guard against matching proper prefixes - in your example JS fiddle it appears to match 'seven' as a proper prefix when it should match 'seventeen'. You'll want to include white space guards within the regular expression string to force full-word matching. –  Mike Edwards Nov 9 '13 at 20:58
    
Neat idea, I'm going to incorporate this in my French lexical analyzer to suggest number (int) representation in place of word (string) representation when numbers grow too large. Agreed with @MikeEdwards though - there are some cases that you may want to be aware of: 7 would be the result of seven and seventeen because the RegEx stops matching when it finds the first valid piece (seven). 4 in four and fourteen is also another example. You need a workaround, like the one he suggested. Also, isn't it interesting that every number in English can be broken down into 30 or so parts? –  Chris Cirefice Nov 9 '13 at 21:14
    
I should clarify - by 'this' I don't mean your code. I mean the idea of parsing French literal number representation into integer representation for giving suggestions when literal representation is "too long" in text. I looked back and realized that my wording was a bit off, and I missed the edit deadline :) –  Chris Cirefice Nov 9 '13 at 21:21
    
In JavaScript, you should always use regular expression literals unless your regular expressions are dynamic. These don’t seem to be… –  minitech Nov 9 '13 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

maybe you don't need regex

function parse(numbersInString){
    var ref = { one:1, two:2, three:3, four:4, five:5, six:6, seven:7, eight:8, nine:9, ten:10, eleven:11, twelve:12, thirteen:13, fourteen:14, fifteen:15, sixteen:16, seventeen:17, eighteen:18, nineteen:19, twenty:20, thirty: 30, forty: 40, fifty: 50, sixty: 60, seventy: 70, eighty: 80, ninety:90 },
        mult = { hundred: 100, thousand: 1000, million: 1000000 },
        strNums = numbersInString.split(' ').reverse(),
        number = 0,
        multiplier = 1;

    for(i in strNums){
        if( mult[strNums[i]] != undefined ) {
            if(mult[strNums[i]]==100) {
                multiplier*=mult[strNums[i]]
            }else{
                multiplier=mult[strNums[i]]
            }
        } else {
            if (!isNaN(parseFloat(strNums[i]))) {
                number += parseFloat(strNums[i]) * multiplier;
            } else {
                var nums = strNums[i].split('-');
                number += ((ref[nums[0]]||0) + (ref[nums[1]]||0)) * multiplier;
            }
        }
    }
    return number;
}
share|improve this answer
    
How about that... perfect example of me making the problem harder than it needs to me. Thank you very much Grundy. –  MyKungFuIsGood Nov 10 '13 at 21:17

It feels like that mult.exec should be in a while block get all the multipliers together.

this little snippet

while( a = find.exec(number) ) {
    if( m = mult.exec(a[0]) ) {
        while(m) {
            multiplier *= ref[m[0]];
            m = mult.exec(a[0]);
        }
    }
    else {
        value += ref[a[0]] * multiplier;
    }
}   

makes things work for the seven hundred thousand, but then busts it for that huge number. The fact that hundred is in the number array and the multiplier array is probably the root of the issue, though I couldn't find an exact solution.

Interesting little problem. Maybe with this clue, you can get the rest figured out.

share|improve this answer

Very interesting problem. I thinks it is very important to observe that whenever hundred, million, billion, etc. occur in the string, it could be either everything before it times that number, or the number itself. If it's hundred, it could be that this is not even the end. We might have to multiply by another multitude later, like in 'one hundred thousand'.

Therefore, I split calculation of the total into 3 variables: totalOfUnits, totalOfHundreds, and totalOfMultitudes. Then revise all numbers in order like this:

  • If a number below 100 is encountered, add it to totalOfUnits
  • If 100 is encountered:
    • If totalOfUnits == 0, Add 100 to totalOfHundreds
    • If totalOfUnits > 0, add 100 * units to totalOfHundreds and set totalOfUnits to 0
  • If another multitude is encountered:
    • If totalOfUnits == 0 and hundreds == 0, add multitude itself to totalOfMultitudes
    • If totalOfUnits > 0 or totalOfHundreds > 0, add multitude times (totalOfUnits + totalOfHundreds) to totalOfMultitudes and set totalOfUnits and totalOfHundreds to 0.

In the end, return totalOfUnits + totalOfHundreds + totalOfMultitudes. Code works for all given examples, and is as follows:

function parseNumber(num){
    var units = {
        zero:0, one:1, two:2, three:3, four:4, five:5, six:6, seven:7, eight:8, nine:9, ten:10,
        eleven:11, twelve:12, thirteen:13, fourteen:14, fifteen:15, sixteen:16, seventeen:17, eighteen:18, nineteen:19,
        twenty:20, thirty: 30, forty: 40, fifty: 50, sixty: 60, seventy: 70, eighty: 80, ninety:90
    };
    var hundreds = {
        hundred: 100
    };
    var multitudes = {
        hundred: 100,
        thousand: 1000,
        million: 1000000
    };

    var parts = num.split(/[ -]/);

    totalOfUnits = 0;
    totalOfHundreds = 0;
    totalOfMultitudes = 0;

    var result = undefined;

    for(var i = 0; i < parts.length; i++){
        if(units[parts[i]]){
            //Add unit
            totalOfUnits = totalOfUnits + units[parts[i]];
        }else if(hundreds[parts[i]]){
            totalOfHundreds += hundreds[parts[i]] * (totalOfUnits || 1);
            totalOfUnits = 0;
        }else if(multitudes[parts[i]]){
            totalOfMultitudes += multitudes[parts[i]] * (((totalOfUnits || 0) + (totalOfHundreds || 0)) || 1);
            totalOfUnits = totalOfHundreds = 0;
        }
    }

    return totalOfUnits + totalOfHundreds + totalOfMultitudes;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your advice Borre. I like the idea of splitting it into three different types instead of just two. Cheers. –  MyKungFuIsGood Nov 10 '13 at 21:21

This is not an answer but I like to comment on the approach a little bit as I don't see how you could possibly parse the words with your current algorithm. You may get it to work for one particular instance or range but it will never work for all variations of words.

It would be easier and more predictable if you would count all types of units separately in a data structure e.g.

var data = {
    millions:3, 
    hundredThousands:2,
    tenThousands:6, 
    thousands:6, 
    hundreds:0, 
    tens:8, 
    ones:9
};

After the counting you can simply string all the results (zero included) to make up the integer value.

var value = [
        data.millions,
        data.hundredThousands,
        data.tenThousands,
        data.thousands,
        data.hundreds,
        data.tens,
        data.ones
    ].join('');

return parseInt(value); // 3266089
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.