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I have grown used to using my thumb on Alt and crossing over with my index finger to hit the f or the b key for moving forwards or backwords one word in Emacs. But now that I have a Daskeyboard Ultimate without lettering on the keys I find myself often missing. I guess I relied too much on looking at the keyboard. Anyway, I was wondering if there was a proper way to describe keyboard fingering similar to the way it is suggested in written piano scores. For this specific case, should the pinky be used? Using the pinky on Alt would make it difficult to hit other keys in the pinky column such as q, a, and z.

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Why not paint the letters and other characters onto the keys ? –  High Performance Mark Nov 9 '13 at 21:13
    
The proper keyboard technique was invented before the invention of computers, so there is no proper method for hitting keys that are not on a manual typewriter. Moreover, the size and location of the modifier keys vary depending upon the keyboard. I learned to type on a manual typewriter with carbon paper for making more than one copy -- those were the days of the real cc (carbon copy). –  lawlist Nov 9 '13 at 21:20
    
@HighPerformanceMark that would defeat the purpose. I want to learn touch-typing by not allowing myself to look at the keys. –  Reed G. Law Nov 9 '13 at 21:43
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There isn't one true way of doing it. Xah Lee writes a lot on how to make Emacs more useful (in his view), here's example that deals with some typing problems: ergoemacs.org/emacs/emacs_pinky.html But I wouldn't use the keyboard he likes, neither some of his techniques appeal to me. I think that pressing meta with thumb is the way to go, feels comfortable on the keyboard I'm using. I also knew someone who swapped meta and control keys, while having control in place of capslock. He would press meta with the bottom-left side of his palm. I can't do it, but it was perfect for him. –  user797257 Nov 9 '13 at 22:04
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Using the thumb means you don't leave touch-typing position. Although it's awkward to bend it when Alt is between z and x. I'd be happy to get a keyboard with Alt under c. –  abo-abo Nov 10 '13 at 10:20
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1 Answer

You should use two hands whenever possible to minimise cross fingering. For this particular case:

  • M-b, left hand for Alt and right hand for b
  • M-f, right hand for Alt and left hand for f

I use the thumb to press Alt and the index for b and f.

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Wow, this is so obvious but I missed it due to a many-years bad habit of only using the left-hand conrol, shift, and meta keys. I almost forgot that those keys are mirrored on the right hand. Now I'm wondering how to break bad keyboard habits... –  Reed G. Law Nov 11 '13 at 18:21
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