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I have read articles about the differences between SOAP and REST as a web service communication protocol, but I think that the biggest advantage for REST over SOAP are :

  1. REST is more dynamic, no need for creating and updating UDDI.

  2. REST is not restricted to XML format. REST web services can send plain text, JSON, and also XML.

But SOAP is more standardized (Ex; security).

So, am I correct in these points?

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possible duplicate of SOAP or REST for Web Services? –  John Saunders Mar 11 at 1:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 77 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there are a lot of misinformation and misconceptions around REST. Not only your question and the answer by @cmd reflect those, but most of the questions and answers related to the subject on Stack Overflow.

SOAP and REST can't be compared directly, since the first is a protocol (or at least tries to be) and the second is an architectural style. This is probably one of the sources of confusion around it, since people tend to call REST any HTTP API that isn't SOAP.

Pushing things a little and trying to establish a comparison, the main difference between SOAP and REST is the degree of coupling between client and server implementation. A SOAP client works like a custom desktop application, tightly coupled to the server. There's a rigid contract between client and server, and everything is expected to break if either side changes anything. You need constant updates following any change.

A REST client is more like a browser. It's a generic client that knows how to use a protocol and standardized methods, and an application has to fit inside that. You don't violate the protocol standards by creating extra methods, you leverage on the standard methods and create the actions with them on your media type. If done right, there's less coupling, and changes can be dealt with more gracefully. A client is supposed to enter a REST service with zero knowledge of the API, except for the entry point and the media type, while in SOAP, he needs previous knowledge on everything he will be using, or it won't even begin the interaction. Additionally, a REST client can be extended by code-on-demand supplied by the server itself, the classical example being javascript code used to drive the interaction with another service on the client-side.

I think these are the crucial points to understand what REST is about, and how it differs from SOAP:

  • REST is protocol independent. It's not coupled to HTTP. Pretty much like you can follow an ftp link on a website, a REST application can use any protocol for which there is an standardized URI scheme.

  • REST is not mapping CRUD to HTTP methods. Read this answer for a detailed explanation on that.

  • REST is as standardized as the parts you're using. Security and authentication in HTTP is standardized, so that's what you use when doing REST over HTTP.

  • REST is not REST without HATEOAS. This means a client only knows the entry point URI and the resources are supposed to return links the client should follow. Those fancy documentation generators that give URI patterns for everything you can do in a REST API miss the point completely. They are not only documenting something that's supposed to be following the standard, but when you do that, you're coupling the client to one particular moment in the evolution of the API, and any changes on the API have to be documented and applied, or it will break.

  • REST is the architectural style of the web itself. When you enter Stack Overflow, you know what an User, a Question and an Answer are, you know the media types, and the website provides you with the links to them. A REST API has to do the same. If we designed the web the way people think REST should be done, instead of having a home page with links to Questions and Answers, we'd have a static documentation explaining that in order to view a question, you have to take the URI stackoverflow.com/questions/<id>, replace id with the Question.id and paste that on your browser. That's nonsense, but that's what many people think REST is.

This last point can't be emphasized enough. If your clients are building URIs from templates in documentation and not getting links in the resource representations, that's not REST. Roy Fielding, the author of REST, made it clear on this blog post: REST APIs must be hypertext-driven.

With the above in mind, you'll realize that while REST might not be restricted to XML, to do it correctly with any other format you'll have to design and standardize some format for your links. Hyperlinks are standard in XML, but not in JSON. There are draft standards for JSON, like HAL.

Finally, REST isn't for everyone, and a proof of that is how most people solve their problems very well with the HTTP APIs they call REST and never venture beyond that. REST is hard to do sometimes, especially in the beginning, but it pays over time with easier evolution on the server side, and client's resilience to changes. If you need something done quickly and easily, don't bother about getting REST right. It's probably not what you're looking for. If you need something that will have to stay online for years or even decades, then REST is for you.

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Really nice answer :D But I have one question regarding your comparision to the SO-Homepage. How would you implement a Search-Feature in REST? On a homepage you have a search field and the search-word is usually templated into the GET-Part of the URL, or submitted via POST - which is actually templating a user generated string into an URL ? –  Falco Jun 2 at 11:23
    
Either one is fine. The issue is how the users get the URLs, not how they use them. They should get the search url from a link in some other document, not from documentation. The documentation may explain how to use the search resource. –  Pedro Werneck Jun 2 at 14:40
    
So a link with a placeholder in place of the searchterm is fine? Because the searchterm is an input from the user? –  Falco Jun 2 at 15:02
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Check URI templates, tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6570. –  Pedro Werneck Jun 2 at 15:20

REST vs SOAP is not the right question to ask.

REST, unlike SOAP is not a protocol.

REST is an architectural style and a design for network-based software architectures.

REST and SOAP are not mutually exclusive. A RESTful architecture may use HTTP or SOAP as the underlying communication protocol

REST concepts are referred to as resources. A representation of a resource must be stateless. It is represented via some media type. Some examples of media types include XML, JSON, and RDF. Resources are manipulated by components. Components request and manipulate resources via a standard uniform interface. In the case of HTTP, this interface consists of standard HTTP ops e.g. GET, PUT, POST, DELETE.

@Abdulaziz's question does illuminate the fact that REST and HTTP are often used in tandem. This is primarily due to the simplicity of HTTP and its very natural mapping to RESTful principles.

Fundamental REST Principles

Client-Server Communication

Client-server architectures have a very distinct separation of concerns. All applications built in the RESTful style must also be client-server in princple.

Stateless

Each each client request to the server requires that its state be fully represented. The server must be able to completely understand the client request without using any server context or server session state. It follows that all state must be kept on the client. We will discuss stateless representation in more detail later.

Cacheable

Cache constraints may be used, thus enabling response data to to be marked as cacheable or not-cachable. Any data marked as cacheable may be reused as the response to the same subsequent request.

Uniform Interface

All components must interact through a single uniform interface. Because all component interaction occurs via this interface, interaction with different services is very simple. The interface is the same! This also means that implementation changes can be made in isolation. Such changes, will not affect fundamental component interaction because the uniform interface is always unchanged. One disadvantage is that you are stuck with the interface. If an optimization could be provided to a specific service by changing the interface, you are out of luck as REST prohibits this. On the bright side, however, REST is optimized for the web, hence incredible popularity of REST over HTTP!

The above concepts represent defining characteristics of REST and differentiate the REST architecture from other architectures like web services. It is useful to note that a REST service is a web service, but a web service is not necessarily a REST service.

See this blog post on REST Design Principals for more details on REST and the above stated bullets.

EDIT: update content based on comments

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REST does not have a predefined set of operations that are CRUD operations. Mapping HTTP methods to CRUD operations blindly is one of the most common misconceptions around REST. The HTTP methods have very well defined behaviors that have nothing to do with CRUD, and REST isn't coupled to HTTP. You can have a REST API over ftp with nothing but RETR and STOR, for instance. –  Pedro Werneck Nov 10 '13 at 0:51
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Also, what do you mean by 'REST services are idempotent'? As far as I know, you have some HTTP methods that by default are idempotent, and if a particular operation in your service needs idempotence, you should use them, but it doesn't make sense to say the service is idempotent. The service may have resources with actions that may be effected in an idempotent or non-idempotent fashion. –  Pedro Werneck Nov 10 '13 at 0:53

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