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EDIT2:

No. The suggested answer is about async calls. I want & need synchronous calls, like in a normal, standard recursive call.

EDIT:

while

__unsafe_unretained void (^unsafe_apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) ;

compiles without warning or errors, it fails at runtime with a NULL stored into unsafe_apply.

However this:

- (void) applyToView: (UIView *) view {

    UIColor * (^colorForIndex)(NSInteger) = ^(NSInteger index) {
        return [UIColor colorWithHue: ((CGFloat) index / 255.0f)
                          saturation: 0.5f
                          brightness: 0.5f
                               alpha: 1.0f] ;
    } ;

    void (^applyColors) (UIView *, NSInteger index) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger index) {
        view.backgroundColor = colorForIndex(index) ;
    } ;

    void (^__block recurse_apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) ;

    void (^apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger level) {
        applyColors(view, level) ;
        [view.subviews enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIView * subview, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
            recurse_apply(subview, 1+level) ;
        }] ;
    } ;

    recurse_apply = apply ;

    apply(view, 0) ;
}

compiles without warnings, but more importantly, actually runs.

But this is so ugly!


consider (colouring the view hierarchy, for exposing purpose ...):

- (void) applyToView: (UIView *) view {

    UIColor * (^colorForIndex)(NSInteger) = ^(NSInteger index) {
        return [UIColor colorWithHue: ((CGFloat) (index * 10.0f) / 255.0f)
                          saturation: 0.5f
                          brightness: 0.5f
                               alpha: 1.0f] ;
    } ;

    void (^applyColors) (UIView *, NSInteger index) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger index) {
        view.backgroundColor = colorForIndex(index) ;
    } ;

    void (^apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger level) {
        applyColors(view, level) ;
        [view.subviews enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIView * subview, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
            apply(subview, 1+level) ;
        }] ;
    } ;

    apply(view, 0) ;
}

I get this warning:

/Users/verec/Projects/solotouch/SoloTouch/BubbleMenu.m:551:42: Block pointer variable 'apply' is uninitialized when captured by block

If I apply the suggested fix: Maybe you meant to use __block 'apply'

void (^__block apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger level) {

I then get: /Users/verec/Projects/solotouch/SoloTouch/BubbleMenu.m:554:13: Capturing 'apply' strongly in this block is likely to lead to a retain cycle

I tried various ways to tamper with the code and get rid of those warnings

__weak typeof (apply) wapply = apply ;
if (wapply) {
    __strong typeof (wapply) sappy = wapply ;
    wapply(subview, 1+level) ;
}

But things just get worse, turning into errors.

I ended up with this:

__unsafe_unretained void (^unsafe_apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) ;

void (^apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger level) {
    applyColors(view, level) ;
    [view.subviews enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIView * subview, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        unsafe_apply(subview, 1+level) ;
    }] ;
} ;

unsafe_apply = apply ;

apply(view, 0) ;

Anyone has a better solution, where I could do everything from within the block and not hideously back patch it as I had to do here?

Note Those SO Questions are about capturing self and those SO questions don't have any satisfactory answer.

share|improve this question
    
Like in my edit? But having to back-patch is really ugly, error prone. Isn't there some normal, standard way to use recursive blocks? –  verec Nov 9 '13 at 23:54
    
possible duplicate of Asynchronously dispatched recursive blocks In particular, see stackoverflow.com/a/14730061 –  Josh Caswell Nov 9 '13 at 23:55
    
No! The referred to question is about async calls. I need regular, run of the mill, standard recursive calls. No threading involved. At all. –  verec Nov 10 '13 at 0:25
    
The solution applies to any recursive Block. Did you try it? –  Josh Caswell Nov 10 '13 at 0:32
    
Are you serious? The "solution" you point at has TWO methods, 20+ lines of code and is asynchronous! I am already sad that my own version has 3 unnecessary lines, and you'd suggest that I add even more clutter, and for a result which depends on GCD???? –  verec Nov 10 '13 at 0:37
show 5 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to capture a __block variable, because blocks capture non-__block variables by value when they are created, and the assignment happens after the block has been created.

In ARC, __block variables of object pointer type (generally all variables are implicitly __strong) are retained by the block. So if the block captures a __block variable pointing to itself, it would create a retain cycle. The solution is to have it capture a weak reference. In versions of the OS that support __weak, __weak should be used instead of __unsafe_unretained.

However, if the only reference to the block was a __weak variable, there would be no strong references to the block, which means it can be deallocated. In order to use the block, it must have a strong reference to keep it around.

Therefore, you need two variables, one weak and one strong. The proper way to do it in ARC is:

__block __weak void (^weak_apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) ;
void (^apply)(UIView *, NSInteger) ;
weak_apply = apply = ^(UIView * view, NSInteger level) {
    applyColors(view, level) ;
    [view.subviews enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIView * subview, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        weak_apply(subview, 1+level) ;
    }] ;
} ;

apply(view, 0) ;
share|improve this answer
    
When I try this with the latest version of Xcode the compiler flags it with a warning "assigning block literal to a weak variable; object will be released after assignment". Since your approach works exactly around that I assume it's safe to ignore the warning. Do you know how it can be turned off? –  Drux Jan 28 at 19:10
1  
@Drux: changed the order of assignment –  newacct Jan 28 at 20:23
add comment

The answer is no.

We can't seem to do better than using the __block qualifier.

__block void(^strawberryFields)();
strawberryFields = ^{ strawberryFields(); };
strawberryFields();

Thanks to Bill Bumgarner article about blocks.


EDIT:

__block __weak void(^strawberryFields)();

seems to be the preferred way under ARC.

share|improve this answer
4  
This snippet predates ARC; the effect of __block has changed since then, and using it without __weak creates a retain cycle: stackoverflow.com/a/9303704 –  Josh Caswell Nov 10 '13 at 2:43
3  
__block __weak gets warning "Assigning block literal to a weak variable; object will be released after assignment` under Xcode 5.... So that doesn't seem to be the right answer either. ??? –  Dad Nov 15 '13 at 23:58
    
Do it in two steps: __weak void (^weak_block)() ; followed by __block void(^strong_block)() = ^() { if (whatever) weak_block();} ;, finally add: weak_bock = strong_block ; after the body of strong_block. –  verec Nov 16 '13 at 13:20
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