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I want to know the difference in days between the following dates...can anyone provide inputs on how to achieve this?

CR created date
2013-11-01
Current date
2013-11-09 18:17:53.196126
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the datetime module. If you have a datetime.datetime object A, and a datetime.date object B, the difference is:

A.date() - B

Try it ;-)

Example:

>>> from datetime import datetime, date
>>> A = datetime.strptime("2013-11-09 18:17:53.196126", "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f")
>>> B = date(*map(int, "2013-11-01".split("-")))
>>> print A
2013-11-09 18:17:53.196126
>>> print B
2013-11-01
>>> print A.date() - B
8 days, 0:00:00
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1  
,with the above example...I tried it didnt work..did it work for you? –  user2955256 Nov 10 '13 at 2:44
    
@user2955256, sorry, I have no idea what you tried. I made an edit to show how it works. –  Tim Peters Nov 10 '13 at 3:00
    
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'datetime.date' and 'datetime.datetime' on Python 2 –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 14 '13 at 0:08
    
@J.F.Sebastian, did you make B a datetime object instead of a date object? The example code obviously subtracts a date from a date, so couldn't produce the msg you gave. –  Tim Peters Nov 14 '13 at 0:12
    
yes, my mistake. I've used .strptime() in both cases. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 14 '13 at 0:14

First you have to change the input to a type that python knows - datetime. Then use the builtin functions.

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> A = datetime.strptime('2013-11-01', '%Y-%m-%d')
>>> A
datetime.datetime(2013, 11, 1, 0, 0)
>>> B = datetime.strptime('2013-11-09 18:17:53.196126', '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f')
>>> B
datetime.datetime(2013, 11, 9, 18, 17, 53, 196126)
>>> diff = B - A
>>> diff
datetime.timedelta(8, 65873, 196126)
>>> diff.total_seconds()
757073.196126
>>> diff.total_seconds() / (60 * 60 * 24)
8.762421251458333
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to get full days as an integer: diff.days –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 14 '13 at 0:08

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