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Hi I have like 50 pages of code that I should write comments to it ... Can you guys show me the best way. I meant I need you to write me a sample ... the comments should contain nearly everything (classes, constructors, attribute, methods, events, functions)

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closed as too broad by Tunaki, Ferrybig, Kara, TylerH, Joe Enos Jun 23 at 17:47

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
-1: Do My Homework For Me. Could you provide a smaller, more compact snippet. Could you ask any more specific questions? The "choose any part and perform" is rather rude, don't you think? – S.Lott Jan 1 '10 at 13:41
    
Don't remove the code the answers refer to – Stephan Eggermont Jan 1 '10 at 14:36
    
Hey, where is the code? – Victor Hurdugaci Jan 1 '10 at 14:41
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Don't comment what is obvious like

//The width of the line is 2
lineWidth = 2;

or

//Clones the snapshot
tempDraw = (Bitmap)snapshot.Clone();

There might be a good idea to explain WHY a certain code line is there. For example explain why

panel1.Invalidate();

Needs to be invalidated.

The basic idea is: add extra information with comments and use them for explanations, don't create redundancy and duplication.

EDIT:

You might also want to explain why each item in the toolbar needs to be unchecked here:

private void toolStripButton1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    foreach (ToolStripButton btn in toolStrip1.Items)
    {
        btn.Checked = false;
    }
...
}

because is not obvious from the name of the event handler which button is clicked in order to understand why all buttons are unchecked.

A good comment would be something like:

private void toolStripButton1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //Deselect all previously applied filters because the user clicked "disable all",
    //which removes the effects of all filters and we want to show this the the user
    foreach (ToolStripButton btn in toolStrip1.Items)
    {
        btn.Checked = false;
    }
...
}
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3  
In my opinion it would be better to rename the control to toolStripButtonDeselectAllFilters rather than having a control so badly named that you need a comment explaining what it does every time you refer to it. – Mark Byers Jan 1 '10 at 14:28
    
Mark, of course refactoring would be the best option. But in order "to fix" it using just comments I guess that is the most appropriate solution. – Victor Hurdugaci Jan 1 '10 at 14:40
    
No, don't spend time on things that either don't matter, or have to be redone anyway. Do nothing, or refactor. – Stephan Eggermont Jan 1 '10 at 15:10

Good comments will document intent, not function.

It's largely useless to comment assignments with "assign x to y" or similar.

It's much better to comment the code with a higher-level view of what the code aims to ultimately achieve, with pre- and post- conditions. You need to comment on (say) peculiar implementations or checks that are necessary yet counter-intuitive, and possibly reference specification documents etc.

If you've got to comment 50 pages of code, I suspect you're doing this at the wrong stage of your project. I tend to comment a class or method's intent with pre/post conditions prior to writing it. It's a form of mini-specification.

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1  
+1. My "comments" rule is that they should tell why something is being done. The code already tells what is being done. – paxdiablo Jan 1 '10 at 13:51

I recommend you to use XML comments in visual studio. Doing that you also can automatically generate documentation for your code, also other developers can see which method does what through intellisense.

http://www.winnershtriangle.com/w/Articles.XMLCommentsInCSharp.asp

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc302121.aspx

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You should not spend time writing documentation now, you should refactor this code. The design is not correct from a class-structure perspective. Your code should be structured as much as possible so that a class has a single responsibility it tries to achieve, and have a corresponding name.

Your Form1 (bad name, b.t.w.) does too much. It should ask other objects to help it. You might want to introduce a Tool class, which knows which label text and cursor are appropriate. You might want to use inheritance for the different shapes to do the drawing in a shape-specific way. In that way, your Form1 only has to delegate to the current tool.

With better structure you can reduce the amount of documentation you have to write. You might want to look up CRC-cards.

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I actually just wrote a blog post on this subject. Bear in mind that it is 100% possible (but perhaps not preferable) for code to contain no comments and be perfectly readable.

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