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At the risk of receiving negative votes, I will preface this by saying this is a midterm problem for a programming class. However, I have already submitted the code and passed the question. I changed the name of the function(s) so that someone can't immediately do a search and find the correct code, as that is not my purpose. I am actually trying to figure out what is actually MORE CORRECT from two pieces that I wrote.

The problem tells us that a certain fast food place sells bite-sized pieces of chicken in packs of 6, 9, and 20. It wants us to create a function that will tell if a given number of bite-sized piece of chicken can be obtained by buying different packs. For example, 15 can be bought, because 6 + 9 is 15, but 16 cannot be bought, because no combination of the packs will equal 15. The code I submitted and was "correct" on, was:

def isDivisible(n):
    """
    n is an int

    Returns True if some integer combination of 6, 9 and 20 equals n
    Otherwise returns False.
    """
    a, b, c = 20, 9, 6
    if n == 0:
        return True

    elif n < 0:
        return False

    elif isDivisible(n - a) or isDivisible(n - b) or isDivisible(n - c):
        return True

    else:
        return False

However, I got to thinking, if the initial number is 0, it will return True. Would an initial number of 0 be considered "buying that amount using 6, 9, and/or 20"? I cannot view the test cases the grader used, so I don't know if the grader checked 0 as a test case and decided that True was an acceptable answer or not. I also can't just enter the new code, because it is a midterm. I decided to create a second piece of code that would handle an initial case of 0, and assuming 0 is actually False:

def isDivisible(n):
    """
    n is an int

    Returns True if some integer combination of 6, 9 and 20 equals n
    Otherwise returns False.
    """
    a, b, c = 20, 9, 6
    if n == 0:
        return False
    else:
        def helperDivisible(n):
            if n == 0:
                return True

            elif n < 0:
                return False

            elif helperDivisible(n - a) or helperDivisible(n - b) or helperDivisible(n - c):
                return True

            else:
                return False
        return helperDivisible(n)

As you can see, my second function had to use a "helper" function in order to work. My overall question, though, is which function do you think would provide the correct answer, if the grader had tested for 0 as an initial input?

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+1 for the starting declaration! Sportsman-Spirit! :) –  Ashish Nitin Patil Nov 10 '13 at 3:52
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is asking for guesses about an unknown person's thought processes for a private test. –  jwodder Nov 10 '13 at 4:00
    
Actually, I do not believe it is off-topic for asking about a guess of an unknown person's thought process. The question is really quite simple and does not really deal with their thought process, more like a process of logic. Can you really "buy" nothing, or does the fact that you got nothing mean you actually couldn't buy it? –  Ernesto Nov 10 '13 at 4:18
    
@Ernesto. To paraphrase the SO about page, questions must be about specific programming problems, software algorithms, coding techniques, and software development tools. But as you've just stated yourself, your question is actually about the semantics of the word "buy", and hence has more to do with linguistics or philosophy, than programming. –  ekhumoro Dec 10 '13 at 20:48

2 Answers 2

I would argue that the first function is correct.

  • There's no reason to make zero special.
  • every number divisible by six is should result in true (and zero is divisible by six), and similarly for nine and twenty.
  • If the question is simply "can this result of zero pieces be achieved when the only packs I can buy are six, nine and twenty" then the answer is still yes (just don't buy anything); that's the closest to an actual use case for this function I can think of at the moment.
  • The simpler implementation of the first function suggests a greater elegance.
  • If you state the problem more arithmetically, it's most easily stated as "given n, do there exist natural #'s i, j, k, s.t. n = 6i + 9j + 20k" and in that formulation the answer is unequivocally true for n=0.
  • If you extend the above to integer i, j, k, then you should give true also for -6, +6, -9, -15, +15, and so also zero. If you return false for zero then lots of nice pretty properties (if f(n) true then f(n) +/- 6 true) also break, which speaks back to my third point.
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However, -6, -9, etc cannot be true, because it specifically states (I failed to post in my question, but in the instructions) that you cannot use negative numbers (Hence the reason for the if n < 0: return False –  Ernesto Nov 10 '13 at 4:06

My answer is that the second function is MORE CORRECT, because technically speaking an initial number of 0 is not able to be bought using packs of 6, 9, and/or 20.

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Yes, just don't buy anything, but then you might as well say it is TRUE that I could buy zero Mercades Benz' which is a superfluous way of saying I can't buy one. –  Ernesto Nov 10 '13 at 4:08
1  
.. but it is true that you can buy zero. You just did. I'm doing so right now myself. That something isn't particularly significant doesn't make it false. –  DSM Nov 10 '13 at 4:10
    
So if you say you are going to McDonald's to buy Chicken McNuggets, you actually meant you are going to McDonald's to look at the menu and buy 0. That makes sense. Crazy Americans ;) –  Ernesto Nov 10 '13 at 4:14
    
Crazy Americans is not appropriate. You can rather say Crazy Mathematicians! :D –  Ashish Nitin Patil Nov 10 '13 at 4:36

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