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I have a simple C Wrapper program to run a bash script in an elevated context. It sits behind a FastCGI wrapper and allows some service hooks to call my C Program which will then run my bash script as root. I am well aware of the security issues and my web server only allows a single IP address to call CGI-BIN scripts. I own both machines so there is little to no security risk at all. I am a complete noob a C and have literally copied a snippet off the internet.

So far this has worked fine:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
   setuid( 0 );
   return system( "./myscript.sh" );
}

However my program now needs to take in POST data from FastCGI. The CGI spec says it passes all raw POST data in via STDIN. What I would like is to be able to directly pipe this raw POST data from the STDIN of my C Program/Wrapper into my script. I've tried the following which didn't work:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
   setuid( 0 );
   dup2(1, 0);
   return system( "./myscript.sh" );
}

The script works perfectly fine when using normal piping (eg. echo "Hey" | ./myscript.sh) however I am lost for how to pipe the STDIN of my C Program to the STDIN of my script.

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4  
You don't need to pipe anything. The script inherits the wrapper process's STDIN automatically. –  Barmar Nov 10 '13 at 4:13
    
@Barmar Really? Because I thought I tried that and it didn't work. I'll try again, if it works, that will be embarrassing! –  jduncanator Nov 10 '13 at 4:16
    
@jduncanator Yes, considering that the system() function call forks and executes a bash process in it, it should be available to you. An example follows in my answer. –  Amit Nov 10 '13 at 4:19
    
@Barmar You are correct, it does inherit it! My issue was that CGI doesn't end the input with a new line so calls to read and cat in my script don't read anything. Do either of you know a solution? –  jduncanator Nov 10 '13 at 4:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Expanding on what Barmar commented above. Here is your modified C program:

/* foo.c*/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
   setuid( 0 );       
   return system( "wc -l");
}

The wc -l command will wait for input from your STDIN.

Now, compile and run the above program. You will see that it waits for the input and when you end the input using a Ctrl + D, you will see that it prints the number of lines:

/tmp> ./foo 
Hello world
This is an input
2
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So I do, or don't, need to dup the file descriptors? –  jduncanator Nov 10 '13 at 4:23
    
My bad, you don't need. Modified the code above. –  Amit Nov 10 '13 at 4:23
    
Thats what I thought. Do you know anything about bash scripting? CGI doesn't send a new line after STDIN so cat and read don't read anything from it. How else can I access STDIN in a bash script? –  jduncanator Nov 10 '13 at 4:24
    
@jduncanator why not call your bash script with the data that CGI returns you? Will that work? hmm no. hang on, let me research a little more. –  Amit Nov 10 '13 at 4:26
    
Thats the tricky part. CGI sends in the data via STDIN to the C Program. What is the easiest way of passing this onto the bash script? I thought simply piping it would work (or in this case, doing nothing) and then reading STDIN in the bash script. What other options are there? –  jduncanator Nov 10 '13 at 4:28

Try this to add a newline at the end of the stdin:

int main()
{
   setuid( 0 );
   return system( "(cat; echo '') | ./myscript.sh" );
}
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