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I am trying to find a simple way to plot points (given latitude and longitude) on Google Maps using R. I have been following http://diggdata.in/post/51396519384/plotting-geo-spatial-data-on-google-maps-in-r ... more particularly, the second method that has been explained there, using the "meuse" dataset.

However, I fail to understand the code. What exactly does -

coordinates(meuse)<-~x+y # convert to SPDF
proj4string(meuse) <- CRS('+init=epsg:28992')

do?

I checked http://rwiki.sciviews.org/doku.php?id=tips:spatial-data:change_crs but it didn't shed much light either.

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You should ask your second question about plotting data from csv files to GM in another question. Make sure you do some searching first. –  Roman Luštrik Nov 10 '13 at 8:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how it goes:

library(sp)
data(meuse)
str(meuse)

> str(meuse)
'data.frame':   155 obs. of  14 variables:
 $ x      : num  181072 181025 181165 181298 181307 ...
 $ y      : num  333611 333558 333537 333484 333330 ...
 $ cadmium: num  11.7 8.6 6.5 2.6 2.8 3 3.2 2.8 2.4 1.6 ...
 $ copper : num  85 81 68 81 48 61 31 29 37 24 ...

meuse is a data.frame.

When you run this line

coordinates(meuse)<-~x+y

it uses the x and y variables (columns) to construct a SpatialPolygonsDataFrame object, which has coordinates (from your x and y) and attributes on various metals and land features.

It's not trivial to project curved surfaces (we live on a big ball) to a plane, so some calculations are needed to achieve this. This is where you tell R in what projection your data are, hence the line

proj4string(meuse) <- CRS('+init=epsg:28992')
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I wouldn't use the term metadata, if any, the spatial coordinates are the metadata, the measurements are the real data. I'd say the term 'attributes' is more appropriate here. –  Paul Hiemstra Nov 10 '13 at 8:36
    
thanks Romain! And how do I know which is the correct projection to use? Also, you said "it uses the x and y variables (columns) to construct a SpatialPolygonsDataFrame object, which has coordinates (from your x and y) and attributes on various metals and land feature" can I create a similar SpatialPolygonsDataFrame using my own data (ie x and y values) ? –  wrahool Nov 10 '13 at 9:33
    
@wrahool The person who created the data should provide the information about which projection was used. –  Roman Luštrik Nov 10 '13 at 10:28

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