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I have two implementations of bubble sort, but one of them works fine and other one does not can anybody explain me what is the difference in these two

first one this works fine

private static int[] sortBuble(int[] a) {
        boolean swapped = true;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length && swapped; i++) {
            swapped = false;
            System.out.println("number of iteration" + i);

            for (int j = 1; j < a.length; j++) {

                if (a[j - 1] > a[j]) {
                    int temp = a[j - 1];
                    a[j - 1] = a[j];
                    a[j] = temp;
                    swapped = true;
                }
            }
        }

        return a;
    }

Second one this does not work, but they look more or less same

private static int[] sortBuble1(int[] a) {
        boolean swapped = true;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length && swapped; i++) {
            swapped = false;
            System.out.println("number of iteration" + i);

            for (int j = i + 1; j < a.length; j++) {

                if (a[i] > a[j]) {
                    int temp = a[i];
                    a[i] = a[j];
                    a[j] = temp;
                    swapped = true;
                }
            }
        }

        return a;
    }
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marked as duplicate by Steve P., Christian, Don Roby, Adrian Cox, Appleman1234 Mar 1 at 0:30

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

They are not the same. You are holding i constant for each iteration of the inner-for loop in the second example, and using a[i] for comparison, which is just incorrect. As I said in my other answer, the first is also inefficient. The following is an optimized version of the first one:

private static int[] bubblesort(int[] nums)
{
    boolean done = false;

    for (int i = 0;  i < nums.length && !done; i++)
    {
        done = true;

        for (int j = nums.length-1; j > i; j--)
        {
            if (nums[j] < nums[j-1])
            {
                int temp = nums[j];
                nums[j] = nums[j-1];
                nums[j-1] = temp;
                done = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return nums;
}

At the end of the ith iteration, we know that the first i elements are sorted, so we don't need to look at them anymore. We need the boolean to determine if we need to continue or not. If no swaps are made, then we are done. We can remove the boolean and it will still work, but will be less efficient.

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how do you know the first i elements are sorted? all you did is reverse the order of the loop. e.g. will it work on this [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0]? How will 0 get to the first element? –  over_optimistic Nov 10 '13 at 7:19
    
@over_optimistic If we start at the end of the list and swap each time nums[j] > nums[j-1], then the smallest element must be at the beginning at the end of the iteration, so we can skip that element in the next iteration. This generalizes to the above code. –  Steve P. Nov 10 '13 at 7:23
    
Sorry, meant nums[j] < nums[j-1]. –  Steve P. Nov 16 '13 at 6:21

The difference lies in the indexes used for the arrays.

In the first case, your inner for loop with j is independent of i. Also, you use adjacent values of j while swapping, so that you are always swapping adjacent values in the array.

In the second case, your inner for loop starts j from i + 1. And you're using both i and j to index your array. So you're actually not comparing adjacent elements, but elements that may be far apart (e.g., when i=1 and j=4). That is not bubble sort, and this algorithm will not work that way.

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