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var myJSON =     
{"data":
    [{"obj1":"value1",
      "obj2":"value2"},

     {"obj1":"value3",
      "obj2":"value4"},

     {"obj1":"value5",
      "obj2":"value6"}]
};

I've got a multidimensional array similar to above. In the above example I can get value4 by calling data[1].obj2 - the key would be 1 in this case.

My problem: I've got value4 but I don't where it is inside the array (in terms of the key). I know value4 belongs to obj2 and I need to find it's corresponding obj1.

I'm guessing the way to solve this is to figure out what the i should be in data[i] for value4 and then simply call data[i].obj1. But how do I get that i?

share|improve this question
1  
This is not a multidimensional array. What you have is a simple array with 3 objects inside –  Kenneth Nov 10 '13 at 10:44
    
It's a bit abstract with this mock data, but in general you should be able to loop through the array and validate for each item if the value in "obj1" is the one you need and in that case get the corresponding "obj2" and break the loop. –  GolezTrol Nov 10 '13 at 10:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm guessing the way to solve this is to figure out what the i should be in data[i] for value4 and then simply call data[i].obj1.

obj2, you mean, not obj1.

But how do I get that i?

You search for it. It's a simple loop.

var i;
for (i = 0; i < myJSON.data.length; ++i) {
    if (myJSON.data[i].obj2 === "value4") {
        // Found it
        break;
    }
}
if (i < myJSON.data.length) {
    // Found it, it's at index `i`
}

Or on a system where you can rely on ES5's forEach (either because the engine has it natively, or because you've added a shim):

var i;
myJSON.data.forEach(function(entry, index) {
    if (entry.obj2 === "value4") {
        i = index;
    }
};
if (typeof i !== "undefined") {
    // Found it
}

You can't stop a forEach early, so that does some unnecessary looping. You could use some:

var i;
myJSON.data.some(function(entry, index) {
    if (entry.obj2 === "value4") {
        i = index;
        return true; // Stops loop
    }
};
if (typeof i !== "undefined") {
    // Found it
}
share|improve this answer

Try this simple recursive function:

find = function(where, what) {
    if (typeof where != "object")
        return null;
    var matches = true;
    for (var p in what)
        matches = matches && (where[p] == what[p]);
    if (matches)
        return where;
    for (var p in where) {
        var found = find(where[p], what);
        if(found)
            return found;
    }
    return null;
}

It works with objects of any depth and allows for multiple search keys. For your example:

var data = {"data":
        [{"obj1":"value1",
            "obj2":"value2"},

            {"obj1":"value3",
                "obj2":"value4"},

            {"obj1":"value5",
                "obj2":"value6"}]
};

result = find(data, {"obj2":"value4"})
console.log(result.obj1) // value3

Another (and nicer) way to do the same is to provide a test predicate for the finder function:

find = function(where, test) {
    if (test(where))
        return where;
    if (typeof where != "object")
        return null;
    for (var p in where) {
        var found = find(where[p], test);
        if (found)
            return found;
    }
    return null;
}

result = find(data, function(x) { return x.obj2 == "value4" });
share|improve this answer
    
interesting approach, but the point is the OP doesn't even know obj2. The desired result in this case would be the list of keys - ['data', 1, 'obj2']. –  Alnitak Nov 10 '13 at 10:56
    
@Alnitak: yes, the question is a bit unclear... let the OP clarify. –  georg Nov 10 '13 at 11:01
    
ah, yes - it seems the OP does indeed know obj2 - my bad. –  Alnitak Nov 10 '13 at 11:02

You'll have to manually trawl through your object:

for(var a=0; a<myJSON.data.length; a++)
{
 for(var b in myJSON.data[a])
 {
  if(myJSON.data[a][b]=="value4")
  {
   console.log("myJSON["+a+"]."+b)
  }
 }
}
share|improve this answer

I would recommend to revise the entire data-structure, but assume that this is an abstracted example.

for(var ei in myJSON["data"]){
    if (myJSON["data"][ei]['obj2'] == "value4")){
      //ei contains the key
      //do something & break;
    }
}

Here is one-liner, although slower:

myJSON["data"].map(function(e,i){if(e["obj2"]=="value4")return e;}).filter(Boolean)[0];

or for the key:

myJSON["data"].map(function(e,i){if(e["obj2"]=="value4")return i;}).filter(Number)[0];

Also see T.J. Crowders answer using some - still slow but avoiding unnecessary cycles.

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