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I am trying to make my array contain integers but because I use random_normal its giving me back a list of floats. How can I get a list of integers?

It would also be great if I could count the number of duplicates in my array too.

use strict;

use Math::Random qw(:all);

my @rand_arr = random_normal(1000,50,5);
print "@rand_arr \n";
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5  
Apparently, that function produces floats, deal with it. But how do you want to round each number: Up, down, away from 0, towards zero, normal? (Style note: Please separate words in a function name by underscores, and choose shorter, more semantically descriptive names) – amon Nov 10 '13 at 12:08
    
its cant be.. there is for sure a way to make it give back integer... – user2976056 Nov 10 '13 at 12:11
2  
@user2976056 The Math::Random docs mention no way how that would ever return integers (which are useless whenever you are working with probabilities). But rounding them really isn't difficult – once you decide how you want to round. – amon Nov 10 '13 at 12:35
4  
@amon's comments are precise, correct and helpful. You shouldn't be complaining to him about a feature that your language doesn't have (and you erroneously think it should have). – Tim Pietzcker Nov 10 '13 at 12:40
    
thanks for the Answer.. ok, so if i understand you right , icant make the random output as Integer? what do u find better to round up or down ? iam an beginner so what u think ? – user2976056 Nov 10 '13 at 12:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can take integer portion of numbers,

use Math::Random qw(:all);

my @rand_arr = map int, random_normal(1000,50,5);
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thanks a lot !!! – user2976056 Nov 10 '13 at 12:48

Well, usually, if people have a floating point value (ie: 5.5 ), and they want an integer, they tend to round it, "somehow". Though "somehow" depends on what you want, as @amon says.

  • floor : 5 → 5, 5.1 → 5, 5.5 → 5, 5.9 → 5 , 6 → 6
  • ceil : 5 → 5, 5.1 → 6, 5.5 → 6, 5.9 → 6 , 6 → 6
  • round : 5 → 5, 5.1 → 5, 5.5 → 6, 5.9 → 6 , 6 → 6

Though as to which method to use, and how to use it, perldoc -q round answers this clearly:

Does Perl have a round() function? What about ceil() and floor()? Trig functions?

Remember that "int()" merely truncates toward 0. For rounding to a certain number of digits, "sprintf()" or "printf()" is usually the easiest route.

    printf("%.3f", 3.1415926535);   # prints 3.142

The POSIX module (part of the standard Perl distribution) implements "ceil()", "floor()", and a number of other mathematical and trigonometric functions.

    use POSIX;
    my $ceil   = ceil(3.5);   # 4
    my $floor  = floor(3.5);  # 3

In 5.000 to 5.003 perls, trigonometry was done in the Math::Complex module. With 5.004, the Math::Trig module (part of the standard Perl distribution) implements the trigonometric functions. Internally it uses the Math::Complex module and some functions can break out from the real axis into the complex plane, for example the inverse sine of 2.

Rounding in financial applications can have serious implications, and the rounding method used should be specified precisely. In these cases, it probably pays not to trust whichever system of rounding is being used by Perl, but instead to implement the rounding function you need yourself.

To see why, notice how you'll still have an issue on half-way-point alternation:

    for (my $i = 0; $i < 1.01; $i += 0.05) { printf "%.1f ",$i}

    0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7
    0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0

Don't blame Perl. It's the same as in C. IEEE says we have to do this. Perl numbers whose absolute values are integers under 2**31 (on 32-bit machines) will work pretty much like mathematical integers. Other numbers are not guaranteed.

Using one of the above functions in conjunction with random_normal is pretty easy

my @values = map { some_function($_) } random_normal(1000,50,5);

Just be aware, that depending on what you're doing with those numbers, the rounding method used might be incredibly important.

use strict;
use warnings;
use utf8;

use Math::Random qw(random_normal);

my $buckets = {};

sub round { 
  return 0 + sprintf "%.0f", $_[0];
}

for my $int ( map { round($_) } random_normal(1000,50,5) ) {
  $buckets->{$int} //= 0;
  $buckets->{$int} ++;
}
for my $key ( sort { $a <=> $b } keys %$buckets ) {
  printf "%s %s\n", $key, $buckets->{$key};
}

After a couple of runs of this program, you might realize that your choice to round was a bad idea, because rounding causes integer buckets to overfill, breaking normal distribution slightly:

34 2
36 1    # Trough
37 3
38 5
39 11   # Spike
40 9
41 25
42 21
43 24
44 43
45 51   
46 48   # Trough
47 69
48 62
49 79
50 77
51 71
52 82
53 71
54 66
55 47
56 38
57 33
58 15   # Trough
59 21
60 8
61 9    # Spike
63 4
64 3
65 1
66 1
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thanks a lot !! it seems really good !! – user2976056 Nov 10 '13 at 13:55

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