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I can`t use the variable "i" in the method run(). Is there any way to do it ?

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

         final int M = 100;
         final int N = 4;
         final int[] array = new int[M];

         for(int b = 0; b < M; b++) array[b] = b;

         for( int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
             new Thread(new Runnable() {
                 public void run() {
                         for(int a = i*(M/N);a < (i+1)*(M/N); a++)
                             System.out.println("Thread "+i+":"+array[a]); 
                         // i -> cannot refer to a non-final variable inside an inner class defined in a different method
                     }
             }).start();
         } 



    }   
}
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marked as duplicate by Jason C May 27 at 12:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
2  
If you google your error, you'll get at least 100 answers. –  Maroun Maroun Nov 10 '13 at 12:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can declare a final variable p which will take the value of i at each iteration.

    for( int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
       final int p = i;
       new Thread(new Runnable() {
             public void run() {
                  for(int a = p*(M/N);a < (p+1)*(M/N); a++)
                  System.out.println("Thread "+p+":"+array[a]);
             }
        }).start();
     } 

Why I need to have a final declaration ?

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1  
+1 But please add the reason why non-final variable cannot be accessed. –  Juned Ahsan Nov 10 '13 at 12:18
    
Yes... it worked ! Thanks ! –  user2976091 Nov 10 '13 at 12:21
    
I have a quiet common problem: I want to start a thread within another thread but i have to make the thread final - does this solution works aswell for my specific case or do i have to find another "work-around"? –  Yannic Hansen Oct 17 '14 at 15:49

That's right. It is a limitation of Java inner classes! An inner class is not allowed to access an instance variable in an enclosing scope unless that variable is declared as final.

So you need to implement that code like this ...

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        final int ii = i;
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
             public void run() {
                 for(int a = ii*(M/N);a < (ii+1)*(M/N); a++)
                     System.out.println("Thread "+ii+":"+array[a]);
             }
        }).start();
    }

The reason for this limitation is to avoid the need for Java to implement closures. Since ii is final, the compiler can implement the above by passing a copy of the value of ii to the anonymous inner class when it instantiates it. This is stored in a hidden variable ... so that it can be used after the enclosing method call completes.

Without this restriction, a (hypothetical) Java compiler would need to create a heap object to hold the i variable. (Or at least it would if it couldn't optimize the object away ...) That's what closures are all about ... at the implementation level.


The other point that people sometimes miss is that this particular algorithm would be incorrect if Java allowed you to access the non-final i. Why? Because by the time that the threads actually started, the outer loop would most likely have finished, and the threads would all see i with the value N. That is NOT what you are trying to achieve here.

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Great explanation! –  David Wallace Nov 10 '13 at 12:40

Try:

for( int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    final currentIndex = i; // declare final here
    new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            for(int a = currentIndex*(M/N) ; a < (currentIndex+1)*(M/N) ; a++)
                System.out.println("Thread " + currentIndex + ":" + array[a]); 
         }
     }).start();
} 
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Thats the limitation of Java Inner Class as Java doesnot support true closures

Also check out this Cannot refer to a non-final variable inside an inner class defined in a different method for details.

You may try like this:

for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        final int x = i;
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
             public void run() {
                 for(int a = x*(M/N);a < (x+1)*(M/N); a++)
                     System.out.println("Thread "+x+":"+array[a]);
             }
        }).start();
    } 
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you can only use final variables because they are constants and even after blown of the stack the anonymous inner class variable exist. Better is to use a concrete class there. I read more about this error from a link which i am following http://infobloggall.com/2015/03/12/why_a_non-final_local_variable_cannot_be_used_inside_inner_class/

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