Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
#if _OWN_DEBUG_LEVEL > 0

    void *GetPostArgs(TYPE *Fcgx_Request, FILE *fpDebugPointer)

#else

    void *GetPostArgs(TYPE *Fcgx_Request)

#endif
{    
    ...

    if (...)
    {
        return NULL;
    }

    ...

    do
    {
        ...

        if (...)
        {
            return NULL;        
        }

        ...
    }
    while (...);

    if (...)
    {
        return NULL;
    }
}

This is a representing code of a code that produces NOT an error by using gcc 4.3

But it should, shouldn't it?

I mean both cases of the function have return type pointer.

And in the end of the body there is nothing returned. Thats not legal is it? But the code compiles, and much more funny is: when the function is called and runs to the end of the function body, it is returning 0x80808080.

Is this maybe caused by undefined behavior in my code?

Or is this simply just a gcc bug?

Or may I do something different wrong?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In C, a return statement is optional and even for functions with return type that is not void.

If the caller tries to read the return value of the function and the function didn't return anything, the behavior is undefined.

In C99, if the main function has no return statement, reaching the } of the function is as if there was a return 0; statement.

share|improve this answer
    
And what is the returned value expected to be if there is no return invoked in a fucntion body? – Zaibis Nov 10 '13 at 13:31
    
@Zaibis Then its indeterminate, and using the returned value will lead to undefined behavior. – Joachim Pileborg Nov 10 '13 at 13:32
    
regarding to the eddit: Can you point my the passage in the c99 standard where to find? As I looked up the return function types and the appendix J.3 in ISO/IEC9899:1999 and there was nothing like that to find for me. – Zaibis Nov 10 '13 at 13:33
2  
@Zaibis (C99, 6.9.1p12) "If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined." – ouah Nov 10 '13 at 13:34
    
Awesome! thanks. I didn't thought about that if a } terminates a funciton, then there wasn't a return terminating it. So now I got it. – Zaibis Nov 10 '13 at 13:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.