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I have following task:

Calculate x1 + x2 + .... + x20, if the sequence x1, x2, ... xn is awarded to the following rule: x1 = 1, x2 = 0.3, x(i) = (i +1) * x(i-2), i = 3,4 ..

Can someone help to make this task? I don't know how to begin write progression... I have tried writing this:

int main()
{
    int i;
    double X[20];
    for (i=3; i<=19; i++){
        X[i]=(i+1)*X[i-2];
    }

    for (i=0; i<=19; i++)
        printf("%7d%13d\n", i, X[i]);

    system ("pause");
}
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1  
You should probably assign values for the first two before your loop. Also, should your loop go from 2 to 19 rather than 3? This looks a bit like C/C++ rather than C# too. Do you have the correct tags? –  Rob Nov 10 '13 at 14:27
    
I assigned values by writing: X[1]=1; X[2]=0.3; It is correct form or not? I don't understand arrays very good, and how to work with them –  SiRaZz Nov 10 '13 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's take a look at your current code :

int main()
{
    int i;
    double X[20];
    for (i=3; i<=19; i++){
        X[i]=(i+1)*X[i-2];
    }

    for (i=0; i<=19; i++)
        printf("%7d%13d\n", i, X[i]);

    system ("pause");
}

Don't forget that when you declare array in C, indices begin at 0 and not 1. Then, x1 = 1, x2 = 0.3 will be interpret as : X[0] = 1; and X[1] = 0.3;.

Next, x(i) = (i +1) * x(i-2), i = 3,4 .. will be interpret as :

for (i=2; i<=19; i++){
    X[i]=(i+2) * X[i-2];
}

Now, you want to sum the xi for i = 1,...,20. Then, your code will be something like this :

int main()
{
    double X[20];

    // First two elements of your serie.
    X[0] = 1;
    printf("%7d%13f\n", 1, X[0]);
    X[1] = 0.3;
    double result = X[0] + X[1];
    printf("%7d%13f\n", 2, X[1]);

    // Third element to the 20th element of your serie.
    for (int i=2; i<=19; i++){
        X[i]=(i+2)*X[i-2];
        printf("%7d%13f\n", i+1, X[i]);
        result += X[i];
    }

    printf("\nSum of xi = %f", result);

    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}

This will keep track of X[i], iteration i and the final result. You'll then get all information you need. Also, this C arrays tutorial may help you to understand arrays.

Hope that helps you.

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Strange, but your codes not working correctly or I don't understand. I'am getting wrong answers. –  SiRaZz Nov 10 '13 at 18:30
    
@SiRaZz I forgot about %f in the printf. Instead of printf("%7d%13d\n", i, X[i]);, it's printf("%7d%13f\n", i, X[i]); because X[i] is a double, not an integer. Thanks to tell me. This should work now. –  Gabriel L. Nov 10 '13 at 18:55
    
Yes, thanks not it's is working perfect :) –  SiRaZz Nov 10 '13 at 19:02

Your solution is almost correct with some modifications, try this :

int main(void) {

    int i;
    double result = 1.3;
    double X[20];
    X[0] = 1;
    X[1] = 0.3;

    for (i=2; i<=19; i++){
       X[i]=(i+2)*X[i-2];
       result += X[i];
    }

    printf("%f", result);
    system ("pause");


   return 0;
}

The reason I put (i+2) instead of (i+1) is because the array is zero-based.

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As a reminder, you want: x1 = 1, x2 = 0.3, x(i) = (i +1) * x(i-2) for every value of i in [1,20].

It is not necessary to store everything in order to compute the sum but that's your choice. So Start by creating the array:

double X[21]; // 21 because you start from 1 and not 0.

Then init the first 2 values:

X[1] = 1;
X[2] = 0.3;

Now you can use your loop (but up to 20):

for (i=3; i<=20; i++){
    X[i]=(i+1)*X[i-2];
}

And you can also compute the sum:

double sum = X[1] + X[2];
for (i=3; i<=20; i++){
    X[i]=(i+1)*X[i-2];
    sum += X[i];
}

Now, I said it was not necessary to store every value, to be more precise, you can only store the last 2 values. I'll let you do that as an exercise (and I think it's a good exercise).

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