Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a little function i wrote to understand the send method:

>>> def test():
...     for x in xrange(10):
...         res = yield
...         yield res
>>> a = test()
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> a.send(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
   <ipython-input-220-4abef3782000> in <module>()
StopIteration
>>> a = test()
>>> a.send(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
   <ipython-input-222-4abef3782000> in <module>()    
TypeError: can't send non-None value to a just-started generator
>>> a.send(None)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)

Why is there an Error the first time?

>>> a.send(0)
StopIteration 

Why does it require for the first send() to be None? as with this error:

>>> a.send(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
    <ipython-input-222-4abef3782000> in <module>()
TypeError: can't send non-None value to a just-started generator

And then the first send starts the generator( i dont know why) and i send a '0' and it prints it but the second 0 is again none and resumes with whatever i send it(0 here)

>>> a.send(None)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0

This link doesnt help much Python 3: send method of generators

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question 1: Why is there an Error the first time?

There is no Error the first time, tested on python2.7 and python3.3:

>>> def test():
...     for x in xrange(10):
...         res = yield
...         yield res
... 
>>> a = test()
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> next(a)
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0
>>> a.send(0)
>>> a.send(0)
0

Question 2: Why does it require for the first send() to be None?

You can't send() a value the first time because the generator did not execute until the point where you have the yield statement, so there is nothing to do with the value.

Here is the relevant paragraph from the pep that introduced the feature of co-routines with generators (http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0342/):

Because generator-iterators begin execution at the top of the generator's function body, there is no yield expression to receive a value when the generator has just been created. Therefore, calling send() with a non-None argument is prohibited when the generator iterator has just started, and a TypeError is raised if this occurs (presumably due to a logic error of some kind). Thus, before you can communicate with a coroutine you must first call next() or send(None) to advance its execution to the first yield expression

A tiny walkthrough:

def coro():
   print 'before yield'
   a = yield 'the yield value'
   b = yield a
   print 'done!'
 c=coro() # this does not execute the generator, only creates it

 # If you use c.send('a value') here it could _not_ do anything with the value
 # so it raises an TypeError! Remember, the generator was not executed yet,
 # only created, it is like the execution is before the `print 'before yield'`

 # This line could be `c.send(None)` too, the `None` needs to be explicit with
 # the first use of `send()` to show that you know it is the first iteration
 print next(c) # will print 'before yield' then 'the yield value' that was yield

 print c.send('first value sent') # will print 'first value sent'

 # will print 'done!'
 # the string 'the second value sent' is sent but not used and StopIterating will be raised     
 print c.send('the second value sent') 

 print c.send('oops') # raises StopIterating
share|improve this answer
    
why is this discarde? "c.send('the second value sent') " –  user2290820 Nov 11 '13 at 9:03
    
the value in the second send() will have its value assigned to the variable b inside the coro(), by discarded I mean it is not used, because from the line b = yield a up to the end of the coroutine the variable b is not used for anything. –  hack.augusto Nov 11 '13 at 13:05
    
so how is c.send('first value sent') used? if you say its used up by yield a, shouldnt that mean that if there were another line yield c, say, then it wouldnt have been discarded? –  user2290820 Nov 11 '13 at 13:09
    
Sorry, discarded was a bad choice for a word. The value is sent and b will contain the value the second value sent, if you had a third yield it would receive the next value send() and so on. What you do with the value sent is up to you, I just wanted to say that you are not obligated to use the object. –  hack.augusto Nov 11 '13 at 13:16
    
thanks for clarifying! –  user2290820 Nov 26 '13 at 15:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.