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So I am writing a program right now and am conflicted about how I should program it. I have two options:

public class Translator {

private Translator(){}; //prevents instantation
/****
  ***Stuff
  ***/

public static String translate(String oldLanguage, String newLanguage, String text){
         //METHOD Code
}

}

or

public class Translator {

private String oldLanguage;
private String newLanguage;

public Translator(String oldLanguage, String newLanguage){
            this.oldLanguage = oldLanguage;
            this.newLanguage = newLanguage;
}; 
/****
  ***Stuff
  ***/

public String translate(String text){
         //METHOD Code
}

}

Which should I use and why? This will be the API end of my program.

Also, as programmer which do you find more convenient when dealing with APIs and why?

share|improve this question
    
I would use what you believe is the simplest and most natural way to use the code. If you were the developer using this API how would you like to write it? BTW You can create a class with no instances using an enum as the code is much simpler. – Peter Lawrey Nov 10 '13 at 17:45
    
I've never seen enum methods before. How do those work? – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 17:51
    
enum methods work just like normal methods whether static or non static. See the second half of this page for an example. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html – Peter Lawrey Nov 10 '13 at 17:53
    
public enum Translator { public static String translate(...) {...} } Enums are classes. You can put static methods in them just like in any other classes. – JB Nizet Nov 10 '13 at 17:53
    
What would be the advantage of this? It seems more complicated in this particular situation. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 18:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would prefer to use the stateless version of translator, but I would prefer a state-full version of translated. The reason is, if you get rid of state then you can often get rid of an entire class of synchronization bugs while moving some of the important information closer to where it is actually used. Imagine, for example, if the two language variables were part of a 1000 line class. Would you want to look up how they are set every time they are used?

The reason I like state for translated is whereas a general translator can exist without knowing what languages it is going to be used for, if you lose what languages are used in a translated, you don't know as well what to do with it anymore (similar to losing your units in a math problem).

For the stateful option, a version I like better is, instead of:

   ...
   private String oldLanguage;
   private String newLanguage;

use:

   ...
   private final String oldLanguage;
   private final String newLanguage;

... and instead of something like:

   myTranslator.setLanguages("spanish", "english")
   Translated myTranslated = myTranslator.translate(original)

you can use:

   Translator spanishEnglish = new Translator("spanish", "english")
   Translated myTranslated = spanishEnglish.translate(original)
share|improve this answer

That's quite an interesting question, which doesn't have a single best answer. The criteria to choose, out of the top of my head, are mainly:

  • do you intend to instantiate a translator and reuse it several times with the same old and new languages?
  • does your translator need to keep some state in memory to be able to translate, without having to reload this state every time a translation is needed?
  • does your translator have other methods that also use the old and new languages?
  • is there somewhere in the application where the translator would have to be called without even caring/knowing about what the old and new language are, taking a pre-configured translator as argument?
  • do you need to be able to mock a translator and inject it in various other components of your code to unit-test them?

If the answers to these questions are yes, then a stateful translator (i.e. your second option) should be used. If the answers are no, then you could go with the first option.

share|improve this answer
    
The translate does not to keep some state in memory. Also, to complicate the issue feeding the source language a null value will have it result to language autodetection.Perhaps I should use method overloading for cleaner convention? I do not like to use null values as parameters, but I am not a terribly experienced programmer so I would appreciate your input. Imagine if you were using this API, which would you find more convenient in your use case. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 17:46
    
That's the question you should ask yourself. I don't have any use-case to implement with such a translator. You have use-cases. How could a translator work without any state? Where does it find the dictionaries and grammar rules needed to translate text? – JB Nizet Nov 10 '13 at 17:49
    
Those are stored on a remote server. The request are sent using "&q=" parameters in the URL so the connection cannot even be reused for subsequent requests. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 18:21

As per the Object Oriented Programming standard, class is a representation of an entity. So you should define something as an attribute of class only if those are the properties of the entity represented by class. Having said that, add oldLanguage and newLanguage to your Translator class only if Translator entity has these attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
Does a translator algorithm exist outside of programming? This analogy does not seem to apply here. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 17:37
    
Which method (pun-intended) do you find more convenient as a programmer when dealing with APIs? – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 17:39

I would prefer to use the first one

public class Translator {

    private Translator(){}; //prevents instantation
        /****
        ***Stuff
        ***/

    public static String translate(String oldLanguage, String newLanguage, String text){
             //METHOD Code
    }

}

why ? the answer why should I instantiate an object to translate some thing if I can just do it directly .

Translator.translate(S,S,S);
share|improve this answer

A method of a class can (should?) be static when it does not access any non-static members or methods of this class.

Now this leads us to the question, when a member (field) of a class should be static or not:

A member (field) of a class must be non-static if it is relevant for defining the state of an instance (= object) of this very class.

So in summary, if something is relevant for the state of an object, then make it instance data, if not (only relevant for the calculation), then pass it as parameter into the method.

In addition to that, it becomes now clear, that it only makes sense to create an instance of a class, if you wish to represent a state. If zero non-static members exist, then you don't need to be able to create an instance of your class.

share|improve this answer
    
My question is more along the lines of whether or not it should be relevant to instantiate the object at all. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 17:52
    
As soon as you have at least one non-static member, otherwise not (answer updated). – mwhs Nov 10 '13 at 17:54
    
The question is whether the member should be non-static or not. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 18:01
    
If the member represents (a part of) the state of an object then it must be non-static. – mwhs Nov 10 '13 at 18:03
    
I appreciate your help, but what I am asking is whether or not the members oldLanguage and newLanguage should represent the state of the object or not. – Skylion Nov 10 '13 at 18:04

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