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After returning object from the method matrix matrix::operator+(const matrix& right), the whole array seems to be erased! Let's describe this strange problem on the following simplified example:

main.cpp:

#include "matrix.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    matrix a("a.mt");
    matrix b("b.mt");

    matrix d(a.getRows(),a.getColumns());

    d = a+b;

    std::cout<<"hooray!";
    return 0;
}

matrix.h:

#ifndef H_MATRIX
#define H_MATRIX

#include <string>

struct field
{
    int row; 
    int column;
    double value;
};

class matrix
{
private:
    int c; //columns
    int r; //rows

    field** b; //2d array
    void allocmem();
public:
    matrix(int rows,int columns);
    matrix(std::string filename);
    ~matrix();

    void read(std::string fname);
    matrix operator+(const matrix& right);
    matrix& operator=(const matrix& right); //deep copy
    int getColumns() const;
    int getRows() const;
};

#endif

matrix.cpp

#include "matrix.h"
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

void matrix::allocmem()
{
    b = new field*[r];

    for(int i=0; i < r; i++)
        b[i] = new field[c];
}

matrix::matrix(int rows,int columns) 
{
    c = columns;
    r = rows;

    allocmem();
}

matrix::matrix(std::string fName)
{
    read(fName);
}

matrix::~matrix()
{
    for(int i=0; i<r;i++)
        delete [] b[i];

    delete b;
}

void matrix::read(std::string fname) //load matrix from file
{

    std::ifstream is;

    is.open(fname);

    is>>r>>c; //get matrix dimensions
    allocmem();

    //go to the first row
    char dull = is.peek();
    while(dull != '\n'){dull = is.get();}


    for(int i=0;i<r;i++) 
    {   
        for(int j=0;j<c;j++)
        {   
            is>>b[i][j].value;
            b[i][j].row=i+1;
            b[i][j].column=j+1;
        }
        while(dull != '\n'){dull = is.get();}
    }   

    is.close();
}

matrix matrix::operator+(const matrix& right)
{
    matrix rMatrix(right.getRows(),right.getColumns());

    if((r != right.r) || (c != right.c))
    {   
        return NULL;
    }

    rMatrix.r = r;
    rMatrix.c = c;

    //matrix addition algorithm
    for(int i=0;i<r;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<c;j++)    
        {   
            rMatrix.b[i][j].value = b[i][j].value+right.b[i][j].value;
            rMatrix.b[i][j].row = i+1;
            rMatrix.b[i][j].column = j+1;
        }

    return rMatrix;
}

matrix& matrix::operator=(const matrix& right)
{
    if(this == &right)
        return *this;

    for(int i=0; i<r;i++)
        delete [] b[i];
    delete b;

    r = right.getRows();
    c = right.getColumns();

    allocmem();
    for(int i=0;i<r;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<c;j++)
        {
            b[i][j].value = right.b[i][j].value; //RUN-TIME ERROR!
            b[i][j].column = j+1;
            b[i][j].row = i+1;
        }

    return *this;
}

int matrix::getColumns() const
{
    return c;
}
int matrix::getRows() const
{
    return r;
}

a.mt:

4 4
10.5 20.7 30.5 40.1
0 0 15.4 9.8
4 2 -8.3 4.2
9.3 2.7 1.2 8.9

b.mt:

4 4
-2.5 0.7 30.5 -54.1
0 1 0 9.8
4 7 8.3 4.2
7.3 2.7 -1.2 3.9

This program should load two matrices from file, and then calculate their sum. In practice, it crashes inside the deep copy method(operator =) throwing such error:enter image description here.
I'd like to ask you where the bug is and how to fix it.

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4  
Where's your copy constructor? See The Rule of 3. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 10 '13 at 19:33
    
field** b has a slight error. It should be spelled std::vector<std::vector<field>>. –  n.m. Nov 10 '13 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try adding a copy constructor as well.

When you return the matrix from the operator+ it uses the copy constructor to initialize the result. The default will copy member by member the calls (including the pointers to the data). Then you release the memory because the rMatrix is destroyed when you leave operator+ but you try to access it for the operator = in the context above.

share|improve this answer
    
Seemed utterly weird, but it works! –  0x6B6F77616C74 Nov 10 '13 at 20:06
    
But I can't accept the answer while there is no explanation. –  0x6B6F77616C74 Nov 10 '13 at 20:13
    
@0x6B6F77616C74 Explanation added. Let me know if it's clear enough. –  Sorin Nov 10 '13 at 20:52

Well, it appears you do not know how to handle dynamic memory in C++.

Nothing strange here, it is a tough problem, so you have 2 solutions:

  1. Do not manipulate raw memory
  2. Learn how to manipulate raw memory

Obviously, in the long term, learning how to manipulate raw memory is better... but the short term solution is:

std::vector<std::vector<field>> b;

Now, let us look at the long term.

  1. Preface: do not reinvent the wheel, except for learning purposes
  2. Obey the Single Responsibility Principle: either a class manages resources OR it has a business functionality, but not both
  3. A resources-handling class must obey the Rule of Three (carefully write all of copy constructor, copy assignment operator and destructor) and must take special care of handling exceptions arising during those methods

So... let's go! The general architecture will be:

  • a resources class, handling memory (and that's all)
  • a business class, handling operations and relying on the resources class under the covers

A little nibbling first:

// No reason to have line and column there, is it ?
struct Field {
    Field(): value() {} // initialize value on construction, please!

    double value;
};

Start with the resources class:

// An array of N*M "Field" elements
// It is minimalist, but minimalist is good!
class FieldsArray {
public:
    FieldsArray(size_t rows, size_t columns);
    FieldsArray(FieldsArray const& other);
    FieldsArray& operator=(FieldsArray const& other);
    ~FieldsArray();

    void swap(FieldsArray& other);

    Field& at(size_t i, size_t j);
    Field const& at(size_t i, size_t j) const;

private:
    void allocate(); // rows & columns must be set
    void release();  // rows & columns must be set

    size_t rows;
    size_t columns;
    Field** fields;
}; // class FieldsArray

inline void swap(FieldsArray& left, FieldsArray& right) {
    left.swap(right);
} // swap

On to the definitions, where we realize that using a table of tables is inconvenient (would have been easier to just use ONE big N*M table).

FieldsArray::FieldsArray(size_t rows, size_t columns):
    rows(rows), columns(columns)
{
    this->allocate();
} // FieldsArray::FieldsArray

FieldsArray::FieldsArray(FieldsArray const& other):
    rows(other.rows), columns(other.columns)
{
    // Perform deep copy
    this->allocate();

    try {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i) {
            for (size_t j = 0; j < columns; ++j) {
                fields[i][j] = other.fields[i][j];
            }
        }
    } catch(...) {
        this->release();
        throw; // rethrow
    }
} // FieldsArray::FieldsArray

FieldsArray& FieldsArray::operator=(FieldsArray const& other) {
    FieldsArray tmp(other);
    this->swap(tmp);
    return *tmp;
} // FieldsArray::operator=

FieldsArray::~FieldsArray() {
    this->release();
} // FieldsArray::~FieldsArray

void FieldsArray::swap(FieldsArray& other) {
    using std::swap;
    swap(this->rows, other.rows);
    swap(this->columns, other.columns);
    swap(this->fields, other.fields);
} // FieldsArray::swap

Field& FieldsArray::at(size_t i, size_t j) {
    assert(i < rows && "Wrong index!");
    assert(j < columns && "Wrong index!");

    return _fields[i][j];
} // FieldsArray::at

Field const& FieldsArray::at(size_t i, size_t j) const {
    assert(i < rows && "Wrong index!");
    assert(j < columns && "Wrong index!");

    return _fields[i][j];
} // FieldsArray::at

void FieldsArray::allocate(size_t rows, size_t columns) {
    fields = new Field*[rows];

    try {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i) { fields[i] = new Fields[columns]; }
    } catch(...) {
        this->release();
        throw; // rethrow
    }
} // FieldsArray::allocate

void FieldsArray::release() {
    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i) { delete[] fields[i]; }
    delete[] fields;
} // FieldsArray::release

Yeah, all of that just to get the equivalent of std::vector<Field> (of size N*M). I just hope I did not mess it up (Note: in C++11, std::unique_ptr<Field[]> would help greatly...)

And now, finally, we get to work on the core business:

class Matrix {
public:
    Matrix(size_t rows, size_t columns): _data(rows, columns) {}

    Field& at(size_t i, size_t j) { return _data.at(i, j); }
    Field const& at(size_t i, size_t j) const { return _data.at(i, j); }

    Matrix& operator+=(Matrix const& other);

private:
    FieldsArray _data;
}; // class Matrix

inline Matrix operator+(Matrix const& left, Matrix const& right) {
    Matrix result(left);
    result += right;
    return result;
} // operator+

And the definition of operator+=:

Matrix& Matrix::operator+=(Matrix const& other) {
    assert(this->rows == other.rows && "Rows differ!");
    assert(this->columns == other.columns && "Columns differ!");

    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i) {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < columns; ++j) {
            this->at(i, j) += other.at(i, j);
        }
    }

    return *this;
} // Matrix::operator+=

I'll leave the implementation of other methods as an exercise for the reader ;)

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