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I'm trying to write this algorithm for C++, but when I try to run it, nothing comes up. I have looked at everything in terms of what is wrong, but I can't find it. I haven't programmed in a year, so I'm getting back into things. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void quickSort(int A[], int p, int r);
int partition(int A[], int p, int r);

int main(void)
{
    int elements = 8; 
    int number[8] = { 2, 8, 7, 1, 3, 5, 6, 4 };

    int first = 0;
    int last = elements - 1;

    quickSort(number, first, last);

    cout << "Sorted elements: ";

    for (int i = 0; i < elements; i++)
    {
        cout << number[i] << " ";
    }

    cout << endl;

    return 0;

}

void quickSort(int A[], int p, int r)
{
    if (p < r)
    {
        int q= 0;
        q = partition(A, p, r);
        quickSort(A, p, q - 1);
        quickSort(A, q + 1, r);
    }
}

int partition(int A[], int p, int r)
{
    int temp;

    int x = A[r];
    int i = p - 1;
    for (int j = 0; j < r - 1; j++)
    {
        if (A[j] <= x)
        {
            i++;
            temp = A[j];
            A[j] = A[i];
            A[i] = temp;
        }
    }

    temp = A[r];
    A[r] = A[i + 1];
    A[i + 1] = temp;

    return (i+1);
}
share|improve this question
    
What happens if you remove quickSort(number, first, last); from main, is it still the case that nothing comes up? If so then the problem isn't with your code, it's that you are running your program incorrectly. –  john Nov 10 '13 at 21:58
    
If I remove that, the elements come up unsorted. –  Castellanos Nov 10 '13 at 21:59
    
You've a run-time problem which ends up the execution, it seems somewhere is invoking an undefined behavior. –  deepmax Nov 10 '13 at 22:00
    
OK so it's likely crashing in your quicksort code somewhere. Time to use a debugger. –  john Nov 10 '13 at 22:01
    
int q = 0; q = partition(...); why not just write int q = partition(...); –  kfsone Nov 10 '13 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Loop condition inside the partition function should be :

for (int j = p; j <= r-1; j++)

That should fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
That did it. Thank you so much! –  Castellanos Nov 10 '13 at 22:13

I have quickly tested your program and for this input this version gives me the correct output:

int partition(int A[], int p, int r)
{
    int temp;

    int x = A[r];
    int i = p - 1;
    for (int j = p; j < r; j++)
    {
        if (A[j] <= x)
        {
            i++;
            temp = A[j];
            A[j] = A[i];
            A[i] = temp;
        }
    }

    temp = A[r];
    A[r] = A[i + 1];
    A[i + 1] = temp;

    return (i+1);
}

The change is in the loop limits.

share|improve this answer
    
This is correct. Thank you so much! –  Castellanos Nov 10 '13 at 22:13

You're code stucks in an infinite recursion and consumes memory until invokes undefined behavior. Therefor it may stops execution and prints nothing.

Your partition function has serious problems, while I can not find out your logic, you should use a debugger to trap the problem. Check your i and j variables. For example this quick fix made some output which is correct:

for (int j = i+1; j < r ; j++)
             ^^^      ^

Output:

Sorted elements: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

I'm not sure it will work for any size of data or not. Live code.

share|improve this answer
    
That helped as well. Thank you so much! –  Castellanos Nov 10 '13 at 22:14

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