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Sorry for the bad description in the title.

Consider a 2-dimensional list such as this:

list = [
    [1, 2],
    [2, 3],
    [3, 4]
]

If I were to extract all possible "vertical" combinations of this list, for a total of 2*2*2=8 combinations, they would be the following sequences:

1, 2, 3
2, 2, 3
1, 3, 3
2, 3, 3
1, 2, 4
2, 2, 4
1, 3, 4
2, 3, 4

Now, let's say I remove some of these sequences. Let's say I only want to keep sequences which have either the number 2 in position #1 OR number 4 in position #3. Then I would be left with these sequences:

2, 2, 3
2, 3, 3
1, 2, 4
2, 2, 4
1, 3, 4
2, 3, 4

The problem

I would like to re-combine these remaining sequences to the least possible amount of 2-dimensional lists needed to contain all sequences but no less or no more.

By doing so, the resulting 2-dimensional lists in this particular example would be:

list_1 = [
    [2],
    [2, 3],
    [3, 4]
]
list_2 = [
    [1],
    [2, 3],
    [4] 
]

In this particular case, the resulting lists can be thought out. But how would I go about if there were thousands of sequences yielding hundereds of 2-dimensional lists? I have been trying to come up with a good algorithm for two weeks now, but I am getting nowhere near a satisfying result.

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What's your current algorithm and what are you unhappy about? –  Simeon Visser Nov 10 '13 at 22:26
    
The algorithms I came up with were all spaghetti-like. And while indeed producing a number of 2-dimensional lists from a set of sequences, they were not producing the least possible amount of them. –  Dennis Hedback Nov 10 '13 at 22:36
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1 Answer

Divide et impera, or divide and conquer. If we have a logical expression, stating that the value at position x should be a or the value at position y should be b, then we have 3 cases:

  1. a is the value at position x and b is the value at position y
  2. a is the value at position x and b is not the value at position y
  3. a is not the value at position x and b is the value at position y

So, first you generate all your scenarios, you know now that you have 3 scenarios.

Then, you effectively separate your cases and handle all of them in a sub-routine as they were your main tasks. The philosophy behind divide et imera is to reduce your complex problem into several similar, but less complex problems, until you reach triviality.

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This is not my problem. My problem is the combination of a given number of sequences into lists, regardless of what sequences I had from the beginning or what measures i took to filter out certain sequences. –  Dennis Hedback Nov 11 '13 at 8:47
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